September 07, 2013

Revealing Ancestral Central America, a symposium at the museum in Washington, Sunday, September 8, 2013

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Ulúa River female figure, 900–200 BC. Campo Dos (United Fruit Company Farm 2), Cortés Department, Honduras. Pottery. Collected or excavated by Gregory Mason, acquired by MAI, 1932. 7.2 × 5.5 × 11.25 cm (18/3091). Photo by Ernest Amoroso, NMAI


This Sunday, September 8, from 10:30 AM to 3:45 PM EDT, the Smithsonian Latino Center and the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., will host Revealing Ancestral Central America, a symposium presenting current scholarship into the interpretation and recovery of Central America’s rich indigenous heritage. For those unable to attend the symposium in person, the program will be webcast live. (A link to the archived broadcast will also be posted on the NMAI YouTube Channel later in the week.)

Revealing Ancestral Central America and the related exhibition, Cerámica de los Ancestros: Central America’s Past Revealed, on view at the museum in Washington through February 1, 2015, are products of the happy discovery by researchers from the Latino Center that the museum’s holdings include one of the largest and most significant collections of Central American archaeological objects in the world—some 17,000 pieces, including more than 10,000 intact vessels, few of which had been studied or exhibited.

In her essay for the companion book to the exhibition and symposium, Rosemary A. Joyce, professor of archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley, offers a glimpse of the kinds of knowledge to be gained from such a collection:

Take as an example an assemblage [of some 400 objects] recovered from a site in the Ulúa river valley in Honduras, called Farm Two by Gregory Mason, who collected the materials for the Heye Foundation [the New York institution that became Museum of the American Indian (MAI) and, in 1989, the National Museum of the American Indian]. . . .

Obsidian, jade, and marine shell were imported from distances ranging from thirty to more than 250 kilometers. While most of the painted and mold-made pottery was locally crafted, some dishes came from Belize or Guatemala, some jars from the Sulaco valley to the east. And all this from a rural village whose modest houses were made of poles, covered with clay, topped with straw roofs. . . .

At scales ranging from larger-than-life stone sculptures depicting humans and supernatural beings to the intimacy of jewelry . . . , it is evident that the people of pre-16th-century Central American societies lived in a visually rich, materially luxurious world. Nor was this visual and material richness limited to a small, privileged group. Even in the most stratified and unequal societies in the region, such as those of the Classic Maya (ca. AD 250–850), research in rural locations like the well-preserved village of Joya del Cerén, El Salvador, shows that farmers owned dozens of pottery vessels, many of them brightly painted or modeled into the shapes of fantastic animals. . . .

In contrast to earlier generations of scholars, who focused on economic and political stratification to describe pre-Hispanic Central America, Dr. Joyce and her colleagues are re-creating a more complex, detailed picture: 

. . . [A] chain of societies connected through intentional human action leading to travel, exchange, and participation by visitors in social events. . . .

The dazzling objects in collections established by archaeologists and museums are making visible what we should have known all along: between the apparently small, isolated villages of Central American there existed enduring ties composed of social relations, respect for beliefs about the place of humans in the cosmos, and shared appreciation for items of beauty and the materials from which they could be made. 

Prof. Joyce's symposium presentation, "What Archaeology Reveals about Central America's Past," will be followed by "Interethnic Relations and Multicultural Landscapes in Ancestral Central America," by John Hoopes (Kansas State); "Indigenous Heritage in Central America Today," by Victor Monteyo (Jakaltek Maya; University of California, Davis) and Georgina Hernández (Museo de la Palabra y Memoria, El Salvador); and "Perserving Central America's Patrimony," by the Hon. Muni Figueres (Ambassador of Costa Rica), Fabio Amador (National Geographic), Francisco Ulloa–Corrales (National Museum of Costa Rica), and Prof. Joyce.

We hope you can attend the symposium and see the exhibition in person. But if not, a wealth of materials are available on line—not simply the live webcast (and eventually the archived video on the NMAI YouTube Channel), but the exhibition website in Spanish and English, and the complete catalog, edited by Dr. Joyce, as a downloadable pdf.

Revealing Ancestral Central America 
Sunday, September 8, 2013
10:30 AM to 3:45 PM EDT
Rasmuson Theater, National Museum of the American Indian
4th & Independence SW, Washington, DC

This program received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Excerpt from: Joyce, Rosemary A., “Surrounded by Beauty: Central America before 1500,” in Revealing Ancestral Central America, ed. Rosemary A. Joyce, 13–21 (Washington, DC: The Smithsonian Latino Center and the National Museum of the American Indian, 2013). 

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I hope carbon dating has been done on these objects, i would love to read more on this.

I never saw that kind of rare images ever. It's really a good one with well explained blog about the unique topic.

July 17, 2013

2013 Living Earth Festival headlines the museum's summer webcast season


The National Museum of the American Indian in Washington D.C., museum is hosting many excellent public programs this summer for audiences of all ages and a wide range of interests. Here is a schedule of upcoming programs available on the Internet via webcast. 

Live webcasts can be accessed though the NMAI webcast page.

Not free during a program you'd like to see? Wish you had seen an earlier program? Most webcasts are archived on the NMAI YouTube Channel within a few days of the event.

Please note: Times for live performances and webcasts are given as Eastern Daylight Time.

LEFestLogo2013mini
2013 LIVING EARTH FESTIVAL 
July 19 through 21

The museum’s annual Living Earth Festival celebrates Native contributions to protecting the environment, promoting sustainability, and using indigenous plants to improve health and nutrition. Such a celebration entails much fun with art, music, dance, and cooking, as well as reports from Indian County on how Native peoples are developing solutions to protect public health and the environment.

On Friday, July 19, at 1 pm and 2 pm, the museum will webcast a fun hands-on activity for children of all ages from the imagiNATIONS Activity Center.  Muscogee Creek sculptor Lisan Tiger Blair will lead a workshop in creating animal and human forms from clay and other materials.

Saturday, July 20, will be filled with music and dance. Enjoy these performances and mini-concerts broadcast from the Potomac Atrium:

11:15 AM | Ho`omau I Ka Wai Ola O Hawai`i, Hawaiian music and dance

Noon | Quetzal Guerrero, virtuoso violin and vocals

12:30 PM | She King (Six Nations Reserve), contemporary rock out of Toronto

1 PM | Pokagon Drum and Dance Troupe (Potawatomi), traditional and fancy dancing performed at many powwows throughout the United States

2 PM | Ozomatli, urban–Latin fusion from Los Angeles

 

Studying biotoxins in fish 07-16
Tribal ecoAmbassadors at work: A Northwest Indian College project studying biotoxins in fish. Photo courtesy of the EPA


Saturday from 2:30 to 4 PM
, the webcast will move to the Rasmuson Theater to present the Living Earth Symposium: Tribal ecoAmbassadors.  Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientists, tribal college and university professors, and Native students are conducting projects that help community residents become part of an environmentally conscious future. Learn how these Tribal ecoAmbassadors are developing innovative and locally relevant solutions to protect public healthand the environment—from creating carbon-negative and sustainable building materials to participatory air quality monitoring to exploring the impacts mercury and other toxics have on human health. 

Saturday from 5 to 8 PM,  the day concludes with an Indian Summer Showcase of musical concerts. If your musical appetite was whetted by the day's mini-concerts, be sure to tune in for the artists' feature performances. Quetzal Guerrero's music bridges many Latin and American cultures and styles. Pop artist She King from Six Nations Reserve captivates listeners with her power, passion, and seducing vocals. Ozomatli, a two-time Grammy Award–winning band, describes its sound as "urban-Latino-and-beyond collision of hip hop and salsa, dancehall and cumbia, samba and funk, merengue and comparsa, East LA R&B and New Orleans second line, Jamaican ragga and Indian raga."  

Quetzal Guerrero mini She King mini  

 

 

Ozomatli

Clockwise from upper left: Quetzal Guerrero; photo courtesy of the artist. She King; photo courtesy of the artist. Ozomatl; photo copyright 2012 Christian Lantry; used with permission.


On Sunday, July 21, from noon to 4:30 PM, the museum will webcast the Living Earth Festival’s iconic cooking face-off, Native Chef Cooking Competition. This year the competition puts the heat on Don McClellan (Cherokee) and Freddie Bitsoie (Navajo) as they cook up their gourmet entrées for the title of NMAI’s Top Chef. Like the menu of the museum’s Mitsitam Café, the chefs’ innovative recipes will be inspired by traditional Native American foods. 


INDIAN SUMMER SHOWCASE 
August 10 & September 21

Every summer the museum brings talented performers to the National Mall for free, public concerts. We webcast as many of these great evenings as we can. In addition to the triple-header during the Living Earth Festival mentioned above, the museum has two more concerts/concert webcasts coming up.

Rita_cooligde_flat mini+ C.J. Chenier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Rita Coolidge (left) and C.J. Chenier. Photos courtesy of the artists

On Saturday, August 10, at 5 PM, the legendary, multiple Grammy Award–winning singer Rita Coolidge (Cherokee) will perform some of her classic hits from the 1970s and '80s, as well as newer pieces.  

On Saturday, September 21, at 5 PM, just see if you can stay off your dancing feet as C.J. Chenier and the Red Hot Louisiana Band perform their infectious Zydeco music. The band received a 2011 Grammy nomination for their album Can’t Sit Down


STORYTELLING FROM THE  imagiNATIONS ACTIVITY CENTER 
August 2, August 9 & September 21

The imagiNATIONS Activity Center is the museum’s space dedicated to interactive exhibits and fun activities for children of all ages. In addition to webcasting the sculpting workshop during the Living Earth Festival mentioned above, the museum will be bringing three talented Native storytellers to our webcast audience in the next few months.  


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Mokihana (left) and Gail Ross. Photos courtesy of the artists

On Friday, August 2, at 11 AM and 1 PM, Mokihana (Missy Scalph), a graduate of Halau Mohala `Ilima, a traditional hula school in Kailua, Hawai`i, will share traditional hula, songs, and stories in an interactive program created to entertain and educate visitors about Native Hawaiian culture.  

On Friday, August 9, at 1 PM and 3 PM, the museum invites you to spend some time with Gail Ross, a direct descendent of John Ross, who was Principal Chief of the Cherokee during the Trail of Tears. Gail is the author of five critically acclaimed children’s books, a distinguished lecturer, and a master of the age-old art of storytelling. Traditional Cherokee stories will be the focus of these programs. 

Grayhawk Perkins 2On Saturday, September 21, at 11 AM, Grayhawk Perkins (Choctaw/Houma), the well-known Louisiana educator, musician, and expert on Native American and Colonial American history, will take on his role as a “tribal storyteller” and share tales of ancient cultures. 

Grayhawk Perkins.
Photo courtesy of the artist

 


SYMPOSIUM: REVEALING ANCESTRAL AMERICA
September 8 

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Ulúa River vessel depicting dancers (rollout detail), AD 750–850. Honduras. 6/1259

On Sunday, September 8, from 10:30 AM to 4:15 PM, the museum will present Revealing Ancestral Central America, a symposium co-sponsored by NMAI and the Smithsonian Latino Center. The symposium features leading voices in the interpretation of Central America’s rich cultural heritage as revealed in the archeaology of the region. The exhibitionCerámica de los Ancestros: Central America’s Past Revealed is on view at the National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C., through February 1, 2015.

 

Disappointed to Miss a Program?

The museum archives most webcasts within a few days of the live event. If you have to miss one of these programs and would like to view it later, look for it on the NMAI YouTube Channel. Programs archived recently include Wahzhazhe: An Osage Balletperformed on March 23; six programs from the 7th Annual Hawai`i Festival, celebrated May 25 and 26; and 13 programs from Choctaw Days 2013, a cultural festival that took place at the museum on June 21. 

—Mark Christal, NMAI

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Nice blog and pics shared by you. It may be helpful.

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December 12, 2012

Will the World End on December 21? Ask a Maya!

Will the world end come to an end on December 21? We certainly hope not; we have some great webcasts coming up in January and February. But before we mention those, there’s a full weekend of webcasts to watch from the museum's Guatemalan festival December 15 & 16.

The name of festival,which takes place throughout the museum, is Bak´tun 13: A Guatemalan Celebration of Time. 13 Bak´tun—the date on the Maya Long Count calendar coinciding with December 21, 2012—marks the end of a 5,125-year era and a new beginning as the Long Count resets. Guatemala is the heart of traditional Maya territory, which extends through most of Central America, including southern Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Belize. Far from reaching the end of time, the Maya are very much a living culture today. Definitely something to celebrate!

All of the museum's live webcasts can be accessed via http://americanindian.si.edu/webcasts.


Bak´tun 13: A Guatemalan Celebration of Time | Webcast Schedule

The Ways of the Days: Maya Calendar Tradition and the Way of Life 
Saturday, December 15, 11:30 am EST

Roderico Teni is a Maya–Qeqchi culture bearer who has worked on cultural preservation and social improvement in Maya communities of the Guatemalan highlands. He is also a Maya day-keeper, one of the spiritual guides who advise communities, in part by consulting the 260-day sacred calendar, Tzolk´in (called the Chol Q´ij in K´iche´ Mayan). Jose Barreiro, director of the museum’s Office of Latin American, will facilitate conversation about the Maya calendar and culture. Audience participation is welcomed, and our webcast audience is encouraged to participate via Twitter. Tweet your comments and questions to @SmithsonianNMAI using the hashtag #MayaCalendar.

Maya from the Inside: The 13 Bak´tun as Challenge to the Western Mind
Saturday, December 15, 2 pm EST

MontejoCalendar
Dr. Victor Montejo. Photo used with permission

Victor Montejo, a Jakaltek Maya originally from Guatemala, will talk on the deep meaning of Maya culture and history. An internationally recognized scholar, Dr. Montejo is the author of several major publications, including Testimony: Death of a Guatemalan Village; Voices from Exile: Violence and Survival in Modern Maya History; Maya Intellectual Renaissance: Critical Essays on Identity, Representation and Leadership; Popol Vuh: Sacred Book of the Mayas; and Q´anil: Man of Lightning. His current projects focus on indigenous migration and transnationalism, and developing a curriculum in Native knowledge and epistemology in his new manuscript, Mayalogue: An Interactionist Theory of Indigenous Cultures. The audience will have an opportunity to ask questions at the end of his presentation. Again, webcast audience members may tweet comments and questions to @SmithsonianNMAI using the hashtag #MayaCalendar. 

Bak’tun 13: A Guatemalan Celebration of Time
Sunday, December 16, noon EST 

Maya-weaving
Juanita Velasco (Ixil Maya). Photo by Walter Larrimore, NMAI

Three events will be featured in this webcast from the museum's Potomac Atrium: "Timeline of Guatemalan Fashion" shines a spotlight on Maya textiles from the 1930s to the present to show the changes that have impacted Maya textiles over the last 80 years. Following the look at textiles, enjoy the music of the traditional marimba under the direction of Fernando Salseño of Pequena Marimba Internacional. Finally, Grupo AWAL presents traditional dances from Concepcion Chiquirichapa in Guatemala. The dances are based on a cylindrical calendar cycle.

Bak’tun 13: A Guatemalan Celebration of Time
Sunday, December 16, 3 pm EST

Two festival events are repeated in this webcast: Traditional marimba under the direction of Fernando Salseño of Pequena Marimba Internacional and a presentation of traditional dances from Concepcion Chiquirichapa in Guatemala Grupo AWAL.


Upcoming Webcasts | January & February 2013

Assuming the world doesn’t end on December 21, more webcasts of events at the National Museum of the American Indian are coming in January and February. 

This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made
Friday, January 18, 2 to 3 pm EST

Join noted historian Frederick E. Hoxie as he talks about his new book, This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made, about political activism that led to hard-won victories in the courts and civil rights campaigns, rather than on the battlefield. It is a story of both famous and obscure Indian lawyers, tribal leaders, activists, and commentators who have sought to bridge the distance between indigenous cultures and the political institutions of the United States through legal and political debate. Dr. Hoxie’s powerful narrative connects the individual to the tribe, the tribe to the nation, and the nation to broader historical processes. Dr. Hoxie is the winner of the 2012 American Indian History Lifetime Achievement Award and a founding trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian.  

Out of Many: A Multicultural Festival of Music, Dance, and Story
January 18 to 20, 10 am to 5:30 pm EST

Who better than an Indian museum to say "Hail to the chief"? As our neighbor the U.S. Capitol hosts the presidential inauguration, we salute the occasion with a festival featuring music, dance, and storytelling throughout the museum. Check our online calendar as inauguration weekend approaches to see what we’re offering online. E pluribus unam! 

Racist Stereotypes and Cultural Appropriation in American Sports 
Thursday, February 7, 10 am to 5:45 pm EST

RacistStereotypes
Illustration by Aaron Sechrist. Used with permission
Join us for a thought-provoking day examining one of the most persistent issues that divides Natives and non-Natives in our sports-loving land. This symposium of panel discussions presents commentators, scholars, authors, and representatives from sports organizations exploring the mythology and psychology of sports stereotypes and mascots, reaction to the NCAA’s policy against “hostile and abusive” names and symbols, and the on-going debate about the name and logo of the Washington, D.C., professional football organization. We invite the webcast public to join us in the conversation through Twitter. Tweet your comments and questions to @SmithsonianNMAI using the hashtag #RacistSportsLogos.

This program was originally scheduled for November 1, 2012, and was postponed due to Hurricane Sandy.  

Missed a Webcast?

If you missed a live webcast that you really wanted to see, don’t worry. We post nearly all of our webcasts on the NMAI YouTube Channel. You may find the webcast you're looking for in one of our playlists or by clicking the Browse Videos tab, where posted videos appear in reverse chronological order.

—Mark Christal, NMAI

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October 12, 2012

Exciting Webcasts Coming this Fall

Summer is over, but the fall is shaping up to be a great season for programs here at the National Museum of the American Indian. Many of these programs will be webcast live on our webcast page, http://nmai.si.edu/multimedia/webcasts. In addition to finding live webcasts, you can go to that page just about any time and see the webcast programs that will be coming up. Sometimes you will find the most recent webcast is still there for replaying. Most of our webcasts will be posted on our YouTube page in high definition video within a few days of the event. Check out our various playlists on our YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/SmithsonianNMAI to see past webcast events.

UPCOMING WEBCASTS

Printmaking Workshop with Jorge Porrata, Saturday, October 14, 11 am - 12 pm and 2-3 pm

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Poet and artist Jorge Luis Porrata will conduct a workshop designed for children and their families in this webcast that comes from the museum's imaginNATIONS Activity Center. Learn about the rich legacy and way of life of the Taino people throught the art of storytelling, artist's works and printmaking. In these hands-on activities, participants will create artwork based on Taino words commonly used in countries like Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

[Photo - Jorge with Child, courtesy of Jorge Luis Porrata]

 

 

Stellar Connections: Explorations in Cultural Astronomy, Saturday, October 20, 2012, 2-4:30 pm

Arctic photo

Our first symposium of the fall will focus on indigenous knowledge of the sky. Also called archaeoastronomy or ethnoastronomy, cultural astronomy examines how the night sky provides spiritual and navigational guidance, timekeeping, weather prediction, and stories and legends that tell us how to live a proper life. Our panel of experts will present and compare Native traditions and sky wisdom from around the world. Gary Urton, the Dumbaron Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian Studies at Harvard University, will speak on “Cosmologies aof the Milky Way: South American Views on the Unity of Earth and Sky.” Michael Wassegijig Price, an Anisihinaabe of the Wikwemikong First Nations will present “Underwater Panthers, Thunderbirds, and Anishinaabe Star Knowledge.” John MacDonald worked for 25 years as coordinaor of he Igloolik Research Center where he collaborated closely with Inuit elders to record and document oral history and traditional knowledge of the region. He will speak on “The Arctic Sky: Inuit Astronomy, Star Lore, and legend.” Babatunde Lawal, professor of Art History at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, specializes in African And African Diaspora art. He will reveal African traditions in “A Big Calabash with Two Halves: The Yoruba Vision of the Cosmos.”

[Photo - Artic photo.jpg Caption: Detail from the cover of The Arctic Sky: Kenojuak Ashevak, Nunavut Qajanaartuk (Our beautiful land) hand-colored lithograph, 1992.]

 

Racist Stereotypes and Cultural Appropriation in American Sports, Thursday, November 1, 10 am - 5:45 pm

Mascots (2)

The museum begins Native American Heritage Month with a thought-provoking day examining one of the most persistent issues that divides Native and non-Native in our sports-loving land. Join commentators, scholars, authors, and representatives from sports organizations for a Symposium of panel discussions on racist stereotypes and cultural appropriation in American sports. The distinguished panelists will explore the mythology and psychology of sports stereotypes and mascots, examine the retirement of “Native American” sports references and collegiate efforts to revive them despite the NCAA’s policy against “hostile and abusive” names and symbols, and engage in a lively community conversation about the name and logo of the Washington, D.C. professional football organization.

 [Photo - Mascots.jpg Caption: Edgar Heap of Birds, American Leagues, 1996. Billboard, 6 x 12 ft., commissioned by the Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, Ohio. Photo courtesy of the artist.]

 

Nixon and the American Indian: The Movement to Self-Determination, Thursday, November 15, 10:30 am - 12 pm

NixonSigning

[Photo - NixonSigning.jpg Caption: President Richard Nixon signing landmark legislation on Native American sovereignty at the White House, December 15,1970. Photo by Oliver F. Atkins.]

At the height of the civil rights movement, great strides in American Indian self-determination were made through key policies and legislation crafted by the Nixon White House. Tune in and learn from White House and administration officials who worked with President Nixon as they discuss the leadership, legislation, and litigation necessary to implement these policies and the implications they have for Native Americans then and today. The Archivist of the United States, David Ferriero, will deliver opening remarks. This event is cosponsored with the Richard Nixon Foundation and the National Archives.

 

Social Media for Live Audiences

For some of our webcasts we will be displaying a Twitter hash tag and invite our live webcast audience to tweet comments or questions. We may also provide an email address for questions to direct to symposium speakers. We are still working out these kinds of details, but we will make it clear during the webcast how one may interact.

 

More to Come

The museum has many programs coming that will not be webcast, but planning for the events is an ongoing process, so it is likely that more events will get webcast requests. Keep an eye on our calendar page and check our NMAI blog to keep informed!

Mike Christal produces the Museum's webcasts.

Comments (23)

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Me parece muy bien que este museo tenga estos eventos tan maravillosos, y encima nos mantenga tan bien informados en todo momento. Enorabuena!!

Great information to get knowledge form webcasts. We are very exciting to see these webcasts early. Webcast about hotels is also very interesting to know about them.

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I love the study of astronomy and am looking forward to the upcoming total solar eclipse!
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The museum has many programs coming that will not be webcast, but planning for the events is an ongoing process

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On first view I thought that was something other than a baseball bat, It then got me reading and I realised it was a baseball bat! Why do I scan pages first!

Regards,
Karl

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Best regards

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August 05, 2012

Webcasting the Fourth Museum: A User Guide

By Mark Christal 

A few definitions to begin:

webcast, n. The broadcast of an event over the Internet.

Fourth Museum, n. In the parlance of the National Museum of the American Indian, all of the efforts to provide access to museum programming and other resources to audiences outside the three “brick-and-mortar” facilities—the museum on the National Mall, NMAI in New York City, and the Cultural Resources Center in Suitland, Maryland.

Our museum is much more than just its exhibitions. We put on movies, musical performances, plays, dances, lectures, seminars, artist workshops, storytelling, and the like. Many of our potential audiences for these offerings cannot make it to the museum to enjoy them. Through the Fourth Museum/museum-without-walls/virtual museum concept, we want to bring the museum to the public, wherever people are, though computers and mobile devices.

One “gallery” of our Fourth Museum is webcasting. We have been working recently to expand our webcast offerings. I hope this brief guide will make NMAI’s webcasts easier to find and enjoy.  

CalendarByCategory
You can find the museum's calendar of events via the CALENDAR link at the top right of AmericanIndian.si.edu. To see quickly which events will be webcast, filter the listings BY CATEGORY.

Finding NMAI's Live Webcasts

 One way to find out if a particular program is being offered as a webcast is to look up the event on NMAI's calendar on our web site, which can be accessed from a link in the banner of the museum's home page.

The calendar can be filtered to show just webcasts. The filters are in the left column as you look at the calendar.  A quick way to see just the webcasts is first to click "Select: None" at the bottom of the BY CATEGORY area, and then to check the “Webcasts & Webinars” box. 

Clicking on the title of an event in the calendar will bring up a page with a detailed description of the event. If the program will be webcast, the page will include “Part of the Series: Live Webcasts” near the bottom of the detailed description. There is also a link to our webcast page in the description. All our live webcasts can be accessed on our webcast page at the time of the event,

The webcasts are recorded, and most of them will show up shortly after the event on NMAI's YouTube channel. Under Featured Playlists there are several playlists of past webcasts. New ones are added frequently, so visiting our YouTube channel is a great way to keep up with the programming at the museum.

Another way to keep track of our webcast schedule is to check out the NMAI blog. We will be putting up posts about upcoming webcasts here as well. 

Upcoming Live Webcasts

 

Quechua Storytelling
Andean Storytelling with Julia Garcia (Quechua). Webcast Sunday, August 5, 2012, at 11 AM and 2 PM EDT.

Storyteller Julia Garcia, who was born in Cochabamba, Bolivia, has devoted herself to teaching the richness of the Quechua language through radio programs, dance, song, and theatre. From NMAI's imagiNATIONS Activity Center, Julia shares the story of Quwiwan Atujwan, the Andean Fox and the Guinea Pig, a bilingual family-friendly program. 

Arvel Bird
Indian Summer Showcase presents Arvel Bird (Southern Paiute). Webcast Wednesday, August 8, 2012, at noon and 5 PM EDT.

From the beautiful Rasmuson Theater, the museum's Indian Summer Showcase bring you violinist and flutist Arvel Bird, who is known around the world for his dramatic connection between Celtic and Native American traditions. Dubbed “Lord of the Strings” by fans and music critics, Bird's music evokes the soul of North American history in a thoroughly entertaining, but also enlightening and humanizing, performance. 

Jim Thorpe
Jim Thorpe: World's Greatest Athlete. Webcast Friday, August 17, 2012, at 2 PM EDT.

In conjuction with the exhibition Best in the World: Native Athletes in the Olympics, NMAI presents this fascinating lecture on Jim Thorpe (Sac and Fox), is the greatest all-around athlete of his age. Biographer Robert W. Wheeler will share stories and rare recordings and photographs about the athlete. Dr. Florence Ridlon will speak on the Jim Thorpe Olympic medals and records controversy and her role in the movement to get them restored to his name. Rob Wheeler will discuss the movement to return Thorpe's remains to be buried on Sac and Fox Nation land in Oklahoma. 

Subjects of NMAI webcasts coming this fall and winter include Native American astronomy, American Indian mascots, President Richard Nixon’s legacy of Native American rights, and the Mayan Calendar. New webcast programs are being added frequently, so check out the NMAI Blog and our calendar regularly.

 

 

 

 

Mark Christal produces the museum's webcasts. 

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Specially Like your images you have post. Excellent images.