August 14, 2015

Meet Native America: Cedric Cromwell, Chairman, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe

In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native people today. —Dennis Zotigh 

Chairman speaking at US CapitolChairman Cedric Cromwell, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, speaking in front of the U.S. Capitol during the Reservation Economic Summit. June 16, 2015; Washington, D.C. 

Please introduce yourself with your name and title.

Cedric Cromwell, chairman of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe.

Can you share with us your Native name and its English translation?

It's Qaqeemasq. It means Running Bear.

Where is your tribe located? 

We're in Mashpee, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod.

Where was your tribe originally from?

We have always been here, for over twelve thousand years. We were here when the Pilgrims touched the shores in Plymouth, Massachusetts, and we are still here and have a significant presence today. 

What is a significant point in history from your tribe that you would like to share?

A significant time for our tribe was in 2007 when we received federal recognition after 35 years of working and waiting for the process to be completed. Many people from the area and beyond celebrated with us, including the late Ted Kennedy, U.S. senator from Massachusetts and brother of President John F. Kennedy.

How is your tribal government set up? 

Our tribal government is council-run. The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Council is made up of 13 members. The council is led by four officers—chairman, vice chair, secretary, and treasurer. Of the nine other sitting members, two are our chief and medicine man. All council members are voted in by our membership at tribal elections.

Is there a functional, traditional entity of leadership in addition to your modern government system?

We have a Chief’s Circle that provides counsel to tribal members regarding family and community concerns for healing and medicine. We also have peacemakers who work to resolve disputes among tribal members to avoid the legal process.

How often are elected leaders chosen?

We have elections every four years. The terms are staggered to avoid ever having an entirely new council.

How often does your council meet?

Tribal Council meets weekly, mostly during the evening though there are some all-day meetings. Our tribe holds a meeting of the general membership every second Sunday of the month. 

Chairman Cromwell and his mother
Chairman Cromwell and his mother, Constance Lone Eagless Cromwell, at the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Ball. March 22, 2015; North Falmouth, Massachusetts.

How did your life experience prepare you to lead your tribe?

At an early age, my mother would bring my brother and me to all the tribal meetings. She was the tribal secretary for 35 years and at that time was responsible for keeping all the historical tribal records. There were even times when I would be sitting on her lap in the meetings. So I was exposed to tribal government at a very early age. I guess you could say being a member of the tribal government was in my blood. 

What responsibilities do you have as a tribal leader?

I have the same responsibilities as the president of the United States. We are considered to be a nation, and as leader I am expected to oversee the workings of this nation. I meet with community leaders on behalf of the tribe. I meet with Congress and many U.S. government agencies. I meet with Commonwealth of Massachusetts representatives and senators. I have been involved in the public school system to ensure our Native children are being well served. Our council has also been instrumental in securing our tribal rights for hunting, fishing, and gathering and seeing that these rights have been upheld in our community and the surrounding towns.

Who inspired you as a mentor?

My mother was my driving force to be “all that I can be” and more. She and my dad taught my brother and me that there are no obstacles in life that we can’t forge. She is gone now to that great Grand Lodge in the sky, but I can still hear her voice in my ear encouraging me to be strong and push on in spite of everything.

Are you a descendant of a historical leader? If so, who?

I am descendant of the great Wampanoag sachems Massasoit Ousamequin and Massasoit Popnomett.

Approximately how many members are in the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe?

Approximately 2,700.

What are the criteria to become a member of your tribe?

Direct family lineage from specific families identified in the Earle Report—the Report to the Governor and Council, concerning the Indians of the Commonwealth, under the Act of April 16, 1859. We have a very strong Genealogy Department that has very strict and appropriate guidelines.

Is your language still spoken on your homelands? If so, what percentage of your people would you estimate are fluent speakers?

Our language was lost for many years. In the past 10 years, behind the vision of our Vice Chairwoman Jessie Little Doe Baird, we have had the privilege of seeing our language reclaimed. It is being taught to our children, our young people, and our elders. We have several fluent speakers of the Wômpanâak language and in the not too distant future will have many more who will be able to speak our language fluently. 

What economic enterprises does your tribe own?

We have a shellfish farm and a museum. Currently we provide historic cultural monitors for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. We are in the process of obtaining land in trust and developing a $500-million destination resort in the city of Taunton, Massachusetts. 

What annual events does your tribe sponsor?

We have our powwow—next July will be the 95th annual Mashpee Wampanoag Powwow—Quahog Day, Ancestors Day, and our annual Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe Thanks Giving Day—which is observed for different reasons than America traditionally celebrates on Thanksgiving.

What attractions are available for visitors on your land?

Powwow attracts a few thousand people each year to this area. We have a museum of our history that visitors from all over the world come to visit and a new, award-winning $15-million Community and Government Center.

Opening the Mashpee Wampanoag center

Opening the new Mashpee Wampanoag Tribal Community and Government Center. March 29, 2014; Mashpee, Massachusetts. 

How does your tribe deal with the United States and Canada as a sovereign nation?

Being a federally recognized tribe means we have a nation-to-nation relationship with the U.S. government. I'm glad you asked about Canada, as well. The indigenous peoples of this part of the United States and Canada share traditions and many other aspects of culture together. My father is from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada; he is Micmac and Mohawk Indian. 

What message would you like to share with the youth of your tribe?

We are intelligent Native American people and a historical tribal nation with a strong culture that is tied directly to our homelands in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Mashpee was the first Indian-governed town recognized as such in the United States, incorporated by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the year 1870.

Is there anything else you would like to add?

It is very important that we as Native Americans remember our past so that our future is bright with all that we can be to lift our tribal nations. I have a vision that Indian Country’s culture and people will thrive through diverse economies that will extend our prominence and forward-thinking for next seven generations and beyond, for us and all of mankind.

Thank you.

Kutâputush—thank you.


Photographs courtesy of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe. 

To read other interviews in this series, click on the banner below. Meet-native-america

From left to right: Representative Ponka-We Victors (Tohono O’odham/Southern Ponca) taking the oath of office in the Kansas House of Representatives; photo courtesy of Kansas Rep. Scott Schwab. Bird Runningwater (Cheyenne/Mescalero Apache) at the Sundance Film Festival; photo courtesy of WireImage. Sergeant Debra Mooney (Choctaw) at the powwow in Al Taqaddum Air Force Base, Iraq, 2004; photo courtesy of Sgt. Debra Mooney. Councilman Jonathan Perry (Wampanoag) in traditional clothing; photo courtesy of Jonathan Perry. Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee) at Blackhorse et al. v. Pro Football, Inc., press conference, U.S. Patent and Trade Office, February 7, 2013; photo courtesy of Mary Phillips. All photos used with permission. 

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August 07, 2015

Meet Native America: Kathy DeCamp, Ho-Chunk Nation Legislator

In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native people today. —Dennis Zotigh 


Please introduce yourself with your name and title.

My name is Kathy DeCamp. I am a Ho-Chunk Nation legislator and serve District 3, Seat 1. 

Legislator Kathy DeCamp
District Representative Kathy DeCamp, Ho-Chunk Nation Legislature.

Can you share with us your Native name and its English translation?

My Ho-Chunk name is Cat’i Naazii ga, which means Outstanding Woman, or I Am Easily Visible to See; it's pronounced Chantinazhee.

Where is your tribe located?

My tribe, the Ho-Chunk Nation, is located all throughout the state of Wisconsin—we are non-reservation. Our Tribal Headquarters are located in Black River Falls, Wisconsin. We are delineated by districts—four in the state and a district of at-large members who live outside Wisconsin.

We were formerly known as the Wisconsin Winnebago Tribe.

Where was the Ho-Chunk Nation originally from?

At one time in our history, the Ho-Chunk Nation originated from the Red Banks, near what is now known as Green Bay, Wisconsin. Ho-Chunks love to joke and tease, so we like to point out that the Green Bay Packers are located on what is traditionally Ho-Chunk country, but we are taught to be good to our visitors. Our lands occupied most of the state of Wisconsin and some parts of northern Illinois.

What is a significant point in history from your tribe that you would like to share?

The Ho-Chunk Nation was forcefully removed from our lands on seven different occasions, and each time we walked back to our traditional lands. It can be said that we survived because of our stubbornness. Ho-Chunks are very connected to our land for spiritual and traditional reasons. The forced removals taught us to adapt to change easily, and also that we will hold on to what is important. 

How is your tribal government set up?

The Ho-Chunk Nation is composed of four branches: General CouncilLegislatureExecutive Branch, and Judiciary.

Is there a functional, traditional entity of leadership in addition to your modern government system?

We are very fortunate to have our traditional chief, Mr. Clayton Winneshiek, and Traditional Clan Court, which is made up of our clan leaders.

Our traditional clan leaders may advise in matters of decision. Traditional Court is respected and revered, and although the clan leaders are very capable, at this time we do not use their leadership as such.

Swearing in
Representative DeCamp taking the oath of office. Ho-Chunk Gaming, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin; July 2015.

How often are elected leaders chosen?

As set forth in the Ho-Chunk Nation Constitution, the Legislature is comprised of thirteen elected representatives. Tribal elections occur every four years; however terms begin and are completed at different times. For example I was inaugurated on July 1, 2015, and my term is over in four years; the term of the other District 3 legislator’s—our newly nominated vice president, Mr. Darren Brinegar, began on July 3, 2013, and is over two years from now.

How often does your legislature meet?

The district representatives meet once a month. We also serve on boards and committees, which meet once a month. At times the vice president will call a Special Meeting, and we have a General Council once a year. You could say we meet often as necessary, and we are in constant contact with our tribal members. It is an honor to be in service to our nation.

How did your life experience prepare you to lead your nation?

My life experiences have enabled me to be fair, honest, open-minded, and willing to be out of my comfort zone to complete a task. I have been in office a little over a month now. I enjoy serving the nation and do so in a humble manner.

I grew up in a non-tribal community where issues were often fueled by racism, discrimination, and prejudice. I decided to pay attention to what I learned from being treated unfairly and use this as a steppingstone to success. In the 1970s it was difficult to work where I would have liked, to earn an education and have a future. I decided I wanted more out of life, so I joined the military. I was able to get an education, travel, and see the world. In the military we were all green—no other color mattered—and we were promoted based on our ability, knowledge, and leadership.

I returned home and began working for my tribe at an entry-level job. I have 37 years of work experience. I have been a soldier, member of the bingo hall staff, blackjack dealer, owner of small arts-and-crafts business, hotel manager, and now by the grace of God an elected official.

I went through alcoholism and experienced death and loss. Through the loss of my sister Nancy, I was broken. I decided I wanted to change and am now 15 years clean and sober. I went back to school and completed an associate’s degree in Foundations in Business, and look forward to my next degree.

Please understand that I am not prideful about any stage in my life. I am a humble servant and grateful that many wonderful opportunities are in my grasp.

What responsibilities do you have as a tribal leader?

My responsibilities are to the people I serve. I am here to listen to their concerns and work toward an amicable solution. Legislators are lawmakers. The Ho-Chunk Nation Constitution states that the Legislature shall have the power to make laws, including codes, ordinances, resolutions, and statutes. The list of duties on my job description is long.  

Kathy & Darwin DeCamp
Kathy DeCamp and Darwin DeCamp.

Who inspired you as a mentor?

My mentors and first educators are my beloved parents: Mr. Martin and Mrs. Caroline Stacy. They instilled the love of God within me, and the power of prayer. I would be remiss not to include Grandmother Florence Boyce White Wing, who taught me the value of hard work. My husband Darwin is my coach and companion. He is a humble and righteous gentleman whom I love and respect very much. If you know my husband, he prefers to be in the background. However, I feel compelled to express my gratitude and adoration at this time.

Are you a descendant of a historical leader? If so, who?

We all have historical leaders in our family. I highly recommend reading a book about the life of Stella Blowsnake Stacy, my late paternal grandmother, titled Mountain Wolf Woman, Sister of Crashing Thunder: The Autobiography of a Winnebago Indian. This content will tell you of my historical roots.

Approximately how many members are in the Ho-Chunk Nation?

Our tribal membership is approximately 7,427 members.

What are the criteria to become a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation?

The requirements for membership are described in Article II of the Constitution of the Ho-Chunk Nation. First, members may not be enrolled in any other Indian nation. Then: 

1(a) All persons of Ho-Chunk blood whose names appear or are entitled to appear on the official census roll prepared pursuant to the Act of January 18, 1881 (21 Stat. 315), or the Wisconsin Winnebago Annuity Payroll for the year one thousand nine hundred and one (1901), or the Act of January 20, 1910 (36 Stat. 873), or the Act of July 1, 1912 (37 Stat. 187); or

(b) All descendants of persons listed in Section 1(a), provided, that such persons are at least one-fourth (1/4) Ho-Chunk blood.

(c) DNA must prove parentage. "DNA" means deoxyribonucleic acid. [Amendment II adopted on May 6, 2009 which became effective June 20, 2009 by operation of law.]

(d) Beginning the date this amendment is approved the Ho-Chunk Nation shall no longer consider or accept for enrollment any person who has previously been enrolled as a member of another Tribe (including the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska). [New section adopted by Amendment I on January 26, 2000 and approved by the Secretary on March 3, 2000.]

Is your language still spoken on your homelands? If so, what percentage of your people would you estimate are fluent speakers?

Yes, our language continues to be spoken on our homelands. We strive to sustain our language. At this time we have about 10 percent of the tribe who are fluent. I speak and understand on a limited basis. My goal this year is to speak in complete sentences, rather than slang.

What economic enterprises does your nation own?

The Ho-Chunk Nation owns Ho-Chunk Gaming on six locations:

Ho-Chunk Gaming Black River Falls, in Black River Falls, Wisconsin;

Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison, in Madison, Wisconsin;

Ho-Chunk Gaming Nekoosa, in Nekoosa, Wisconsin;

Ho-Chunk Gaming Tomah, in Tomah, Wisconsin;

Ho-Chunk Gaming Wisconsin Dells, in the Wisconsin Dells, Baraboo, Wisconsin; and

Ho-Chunk Gaming Wittenberg, in Wittenberg, Wisconsin.

The nation also owns and operates six convenience stores, an RV Park, the Ho-Chunk RV Resort, and other various retail shops.

What annual events does your tribe sponsor?

We have a most wonderful event honoring our veterans every Memorial Day weekend. Ho-Chunks hold all veterans in the highest esteem. I promise you won’t be disappointed with our annual Memorial Day pow-wow. 

There is also Neesh-la Pow-wow, which we hope will have larger capacity numbers for 2016. We host various sporting camps and college visits, our annual Night of Remembrance (Walk for Cancer Awareness), and the Annual Family Wellness Conference, to name a few events. We also participate in the community through sponsorship of various sporting events, local sports teams, etc. Each year is exciting and different depending upon what we are inclined to support. 

What attractions are available for visitors on your land?

We are non-reservation and are scattered over the state. Our Ho-Chunk hospitality is available to anyone who is able to experience it.

How does your tribe deal with the United States as a sovereign nation?

Being a new legislator, at this point one month into my term, my answer is this: Effective, tactful education and communication of what a sovereign nation is must be taught to those who do not understand the term. All sovereign nations must exercise independent status appropriately and effectively and on a daily basis.

What message would you like to share with the youth of your nation?

I share with our youth the message to take on the duty and honor to be our future leaders, and to always remember the sacrifice our ancestors made for us so we may continue to be Ho-Chunk, People of the Big Voice. I encourage our young people to remember where we came from, and who we are. I humbly ask our youth to learn our language, remember your lineage, work hard, and be full of compassion and sincere love for each other. Most importantly, build on your diversity; there is power in differences. If you ever run for office, remember this, from Wisconsin Winnebago Business Committee Election Procedures, April 20, 1963: 

Heart and sincere concern for its Tribe is a requirement, if you want good tribal government you must determine who in your area will best understand your needs, be sympathetic with you, be able to interpret and speak on your behalf to the Committee and to your community for you, be able to place your welfare ahead of personal aspirations, who has the ability to make the right decisions for the Tribe, and who has faith in the ability of the Winnebago to determine for himself what is best for him. 

Is there anything else you would like to add?

Thank you for honoring me in this way. It is my hope you have learned something new, and that I was forthright about my tribe. If I have misspoken, it is not intentional. Lastly, I am grateful for this wonderful opportunity.

Thank you.

Pinagigi—thank you. 


All photographs are courtesy of the DeCamp family.

To read other interviews in this series, click on the banner below. Meet-native-america
From left to right: Representative Ponka-We Victors (Tohono O’odham/Southern Ponca) taking the oath of office in the Kansas House of Representatives; photo courtesy of Kansas Rep. Scott Schwab. Bird Runningwater (Cheyenne/Mescalero Apache) at the Sundance Film Festival; photo courtesy of WireImage. Sergeant Debra Mooney (Choctaw) at the powwow in Al Taqaddum Air Force Base, Iraq, 2004; photo courtesy of Sgt. Debra Mooney. Councilman Jonathan Perry (Wampanoag) in traditional clothing; photo courtesy of Jonathan Perry. Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee) at Blackhorse et al. v. Pro Football, Inc., press conference, U.S. Patent and Trade Office, February 7, 2013; photo courtesy of Mary Phillips. All photos used with permission. 

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August 05, 2015

Summer webcasts: Music, dance, and Indigenous approaches to healthy food and gourmet cooking

The National Museum of the American Indian presents live webcasts of music and dance performances, lectures and symposia, storytelling, and other public presentations hosted by the museum, bringing Native scholarship and cultural arts to a worldwide audience. Programs can be seen on the museum's Live Webcasts page. Between events, the webcast page often replays recent broadcasts.

Here's what's coming up on the webcast calendar for the summer:

Indian Summer Showcase—The Ollivanders and Dark Water Rising 
Saturday, August 29, 2 to 4 pm EDT

The Ollivanders
The Ollivanders.

Indian Summer Showcase features two Native American Music Award (NAMA)–winners. The afternoon concert opens with the rock-based music of The Ollivanders, from Canada's Six Nations Reserve. Last fall Martin Isaacs, Ryan Mickeloff, and Ryan Johnson won the 2014 NAMA for Best Rock Recording for their album Two Suns

Headlining the performance will be Dark Water Rising, members of the Lumbee and Tuscarora nations. The music of Charly Lowry, Aaron Locklear, Corey Locklear, Tony Murnahan, and Emily Musolino  is described as full of soul, blues, and tradition. Dark Water Rising has won three NAMA awards, most recently Best Gospel or Inspirational Recording of 2014 for Grace & Grit: Chapter 1. 

Dark Water RisingDark Water Rising; photo courtesy of Greensky Records. 

 

The following programs, presented earlier this summer, can be seen on the museum's YouTube channel.

Indian Summer Showcase—A Tribe Called Red
Friday, August 7, 2015, 7 to 9:30 pm EDT

A Tribe Called Red 2015Nation-II-Nation

August heats up with an evening of discussion and music by the influential First Nations group A Tribe Called Red, recognized in 2014 as Canada's breakthrough artists of the year. A Tribe Called Red blends powwow rhythms and vocals with the urban influences of techno, dubstep, hip hop, and reggae to create a unique musical style. Their songs, visual art, and stage performances champion issues faced by Native Americans. 

The evening begins at 7 pm EDT in the Rasmuson Theater with an artist panel featuring group members DJ NDN, 2oolman, and Bear Witness. The concert in the Potomac Atrium follows at 8:30 pm EDT.

Top: A Tribe Called Red. Above right: Cover art by Ernesto Yerena for A Tribe Called Red's second album, Nation II Nation (2013).

Living Earth 2015

LIVING EARTH FESTIVAL 2015 
Friday, July 17, through Sunday, July 19

This year the museum's hosts the 6th Living Earth Festival. Living Earth shares sustainable living practices from traditional indigenous perspectives and celebrates Native music and dance. The webcast program will provide a cross-section of programs and performances from the three-day event.

Living Earth Symposium—On the Table: Creating a Healthy Food Future 
Friday, July 17, 2:00 to 3:30 pm EDT
Archived webcast.

Green chiles roasting
Green chiles roasting at the museum. Photo by Katherine Fogden (Mohawk), NMAI.

A healthy diet is a key component of sustainable living. The symposium On the Table: Creating a Healthy Food Future promises a wide-ranging conversation about sustainable farming, the impact of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), the conservation of heritage seeds, and indigenous approaches to the environment and harvest. Speakers include Ricardo Salvador (Zapotec/German–American), senior scientist and director of the Food & Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists; Robin Kimmerer (Citizen Band Potawatomi), award-winning writer, scientist, and professor; and Clayton Brascoupe (Tuscarora/Tesuque Pueblo), director of the Traditional Native American Farmers Association. 

Living Earth Festival—Performances from the Potomac Atrium 
Saturday, July 18, 11 am to 2:30 pm EDT 
Archived webcasts of Youghtanund Drum Group (part1 and part 2) and Guate Marimba/Grupo AWAL.

Saturday the festival presents live performances in the museum's beautiful Potomac Atrium. This year Living Earth presents traditional singing, drumming, and powwow style dances by the Youghtanund Drum Group.

Guate Marimba will perform Guatemalan folk music played on the marimba, drums, turtle shells, maracas, and whistles to accompany traditional Mayan dances performed by Grupo AWAL.

Youghtanund Grupo AWAL




Music and dance at Living Earth: Left: Youghtanund Drum Group. Right: Grupo AWAL. 

Indian Summer Showcase at the Living Earth Festival—Quetzal Guerrero 
Saturday, July 18, 3 to 5 pm EDT 
Archived webcast.

Indian Summer Showcase intersects with the Living Earth Festival on Saturday afternoon when Quetzal Guerrero (Native American, Mexican and Brazilian heritage) headlines the first of two concerts to be webcast live this summer. The man with the blue violin returns to the Potomac Atrium stage to wow the audience with his fusion of Latino, jazz, blues, and hip-hop originals. 

Quetzal GuerreroQuetzal Guerrero.

Living Earth Festival—Native Chef Cooking Contest 
Sunday, July 19, noon to 2:30 pm EDT 
Archived webcast.

Chef KaimanaOn Sunday the museum will webcast one of the festival’s signature events, an Iron Chef–style competition. Native Hawaiian chefs Kaimana Chee and Robert Alcain compete for bragging rights as they create a full course meal in which every dish features a special ingredient that is indigenous to Native America. The secret ingredient? Tune in to the live webcast to find out! 

Chef Kaimana Chee.

Stay tuned for future posts about webcasts planned for this fall and winter.

If you're in the Washington, DC, area this weekend, July 17 through 19, and would like to know more about the Living Earth Festival at the museum on the National Mall, the symposium program and festival schedule are available online.

All photos are used courtesy of the artists unless otherwise credited.

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July 31, 2015

Museum Interns Take New York: A Photo Journal

On July 10, 12 NMAI interns and fellows visited the National Museum of the American Indian’s George Gustav Heye Center in New York City. We arrived at the museum as thousands of fans poured into lower Manhattan to shower us with cheers and admiration, or was that for the U.S. women’s soccer team?

As the crowds dispersed we headed into the museum, but not before taking a picture with a U.S. marshal (below).

Interns & US marshal


We were greeted by Duane Blue Spruce , public spaces planning coordinator (below, wearing a red shirt). After a round of introductions, he told us about his involvement with the Heye Center. His experience began when the museum was the Museum of the American Indian at West 155th and Broadway, before it became part of the Smithsonian and moved downtown. Duane showed us two books he created to illustrate the experiences of Native peoples in the New York City area—Mother Earth, Father Skyline: The Native American Experience in New York City and Concrete Tipi. “It’s fun to come and work here every day,” he said, “because the things we produce represent Native people and educate the public. We’re doing good stuff.”

John Haworth and GGHC staff speaking with interns


We were joined by John Haworth, NMAI assistant director for Museum Programs (above, far right), who told us about the imagiNATIONS project being developed in New York. This new hands-on learning space will be geared towards pre-teens and will demonstrate the ingenuity of Native peoples, including their contributions in food, medicine, and architecture. Connor Bliss, an intern in the Exhibits Department, explained that “being able to witness the progress that is being made on . . . the imagiNATIONS Activity Center has further increased the understanding of the exhibitions process I’ve learned here during my time at the Smithsonian.” 

Peter BrillLater, Peter Brill, deputy assistant director of the museum in New York (right), walked us through the exhibit design process. His enthusiasm for the museum was infectious, and he encouraged us to speak up and present our ideas: “In these projects, you have a voice, and it’s important to think and be responsive to each other, bring your ideas forward, and try not to be fearful of making a silly suggestion.”

Charlotte Basch, an intern in Community and Constituent Services, told me she was impressed by how encouraging the New York staff is: “It was a great opportunity to see that each individual plays an important role in the NMAI and Smithsonian network. . . . Peter and Duane and everyone else were obviously excited about the work they do for both tribal communities and their fellow New Yorkers.”

Carrie Gonzalez 1 Carrie Gonzalez 2
Carrie Gonzalez 3

Carrie Gonzalez, a cultural interpreter on the Heye Center staff, then guided us on a wonderful tour of the museum (above and right). She also led us through three major exhibitions: Glittering World: Navajo Jewelry of the Yazzie Family, Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American, and Cerámica de los Ancestros: Central America’s Past Revealed, as well as Circle of Dance.  

Carrie told us that she leads school groups on tours during the school year, sometimes with over 50 kids! I think we were slightly easier to manage.  

We also got the chance to explore the museum’s activity center (below). Some interns tried their hand at a Yup'ik yo-yo a game that requires the player to take two sealskin balls attached by a caribou-sinew string and swing them around in opposite directions. I ventured into a tipi with Sara Morales, a Collections intern, and spent some time looking at the artwork on the interior. 

Yoyo 1 Yoyo 2 Tipi interior

After the tour was over, the interns scattered across the city—some uptown to see friends, some to Brooklyn. We all left the Heye Center with an appreciation for how the museum is changing understandings of Native lives in New York City.

Manhattan

—Sarah Frost


Sarah Frost spent her summer internship at the museum in Washington, D.C., as a member of the Web staff, working on the Inka Road website and new projects online and in social media. 

Photos: Tipi interior courtesy of Conservation intern Rachel Mochon. View of Manhattan courtesy of Applications intern Abby Malkin. All other photos courtesy of Sarah Frost.


The National Museum of the American Indian's Internship Program offers sessions in the spring, summer, and fall. The next deadline for applications—for the spring 2016 session—is November 20, 2015.

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July 30, 2015

Meet Native America: Tribal Chief Phyliss J. Anderson, Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians

In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native people today. —Dennis Zotigh 
 

Chief Phyliss Anderson
Tribal Chief Phyliss J. Anderson, Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians.

Please introduce yourself with your name and title.

Phyliss J. Anderson, tribal chief of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians.

Where is your tribe located?

The majority of the tribe is located in Mississippi, with a small community in Henning, Tennessee. There are eight official communities—Bogue Chitto, Bogue Homa, Conehatta, Crystal Ridge, Pearl River, Red Water, Standing Pine, and Tucker—located in 10 counties in central Mississippi. Tribal headquarters is located in the Pearl River community.

Where was your tribe originally from?

For centuries the Choctaw have lived in the Southeastern United States, largely in what is now the state of Mississippi.

What is a significant point in history from your tribe that you would like to share?

Our tribe has evolved over the centuries to become a progressive and diverse people. The Choctaw people have overcome seemingly impossible obstacles because our ancestors believed that one day we would not only survive, but thrive. From the time of removal from our lands and battles with disease to our fight for sovereignty and self-determination, we have shown that Choctaws are a resilient people.

The Choctaw journey—that of economic progress and knocking down barriers—is still young. We have many more achievements in our future. I share in the spirit of optimism inherited from our ancestors. Our story is just beginning, and I look forward to what the future holds for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians.

How is your tribal government set up?

Our government is democratic, with three official branches—executive, legislative, and judicial. The tribal chief is the head of the executive branch and the chief principal officer. A 17-member Tribal Council makes up the legislative branch. Council members are elected from each of the Choctaw communities. The judicial branch is made up of the Choctaw Supreme Court and Choctaw Tribal Courts.

Is there a functional, traditional entity of leadership in addition to your modern government system?

Not in an official capacity. As with most Native cultures, we view our elders with high esteem and respect. From time to time I may seek advice from our elders. They are our true historians and keepers of our cultural heritage, and I believe it is important to learn as much as we can from them.

 Thanksgiving Feast_Chief and Elders

Chief Anderson speaking with elders at the Choctaw community Thanksgiving feast, November 2011. Photo by Vince O. Nickey (Choctaw). 
 

How often are elected leaders chosen?

The tribal chief is elected every four years. This year happened to be an election year for the tribal chief position. Tribal Council representatives are elected to staggered four-year terms—eight positions during tribal chief elections and nine seats two years later during midterm elections.

How often does your Tribal Council meet?

Regularly scheduled Tribal Council meetings occur every quarter in January, April, July, and October per the Tribal Constitution. However, special-call Tribal Council meetings can be scheduled at any time by the tribal chief.

How did your life experience prepare you to lead your tribe?

I was born on New Year’s Day in 1961 and grew up during a time of racial turmoil in the South. My community and family bonded together during those years to become a strong unit, and that’s what I have tried to share with the Choctaw people. There is so much strength in unity and love.

My path to leadership certainly had some challenges, but I learned to face adversity with positivity and determination. I come from a rural area and a poverty-stricken home. My six sisters and I were raised in a tribal frame home located in the Red Water community in Leake County, Mississippi.

My mother was a strong woman and instilled so many important values into us girls. We knew the importance of education, faith, integrity, right, and wrong. But she also demonstrated the value of hard work, determination, dedication, and perseverance. I can remember my sisters and I would work in the cotton fields with Mom. I even remember saving up all of my money to buy five-cent Coke bottles and refashioning them into Barbie dolls.  

At the time I did not fully realize I was poor, but looking back now, I can see it. To some people, my family experienced a less-than-desirable environment; however, we were surrounded by encouragement, trust, honesty, support, and a belief that we could accomplish any goals that we set for ourselves. These are the traits that were instilled in me by my mother.

Now as a mother and grandmother myself and as the tribal chief of our great tribe, I have used these same traits to raise a family and provide solid leadership for our Choctaw people.  

What responsibilities do you have as a tribal leader?

As the chief principal officer of the tribe, I am responsible for the well-being of the Choctaw people.

Who inspired you as a mentor?

Many people have inspired me throughout my life and career. There have been many elders that I have had an opportunity to learn from. One of those is my mother, as I mentioned before. Another is our late Choctaw Tribal Chief Phillip Martin.

I started my career as a receptionist and payroll clerk at Choctaw Development Enterprise. Chief Martin recruited me to work for him, but the director of Choctaw Development at the time did not want to lose me, so he offered to pay me more than Chief Martin was offering. In the end, Chief Martin won after he told my boss, “I’m the chief, and she’s coming with me!” I served as an executive assistant to Chief Martin where I worked my way through our tribal government programs and eventually landed a position as the director of Natural Resources. Early on I believe Chief Martin saw my qualities as a hard worker and leader, and for that I am grateful. 

In 2003 I decided to run for elected office as a council representative from my community of Red Water. I was elected and served eight successful years on the Tribal Council, including four years as Secretary–Treasurer. Those eight years were extremely tough for my family and me. However, Chief Martin mentored and encouraged me to lead with grace, poise, and determination. 

Are you a descendant of a historical leader? 

No.

Approximately how many members are in your tribe?

The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians has an enrollment of just over 10,800 members. 

What are the criteria to become a member? 

Our Tribal Constitution calls for a 50 percent or more blood quantum to become an enrolled member.

Is your language still spoken on your homelands? 

The Choctaw language is still spoken across our communities. Our language is an important part of our identification of who we are as Choctaw people. The Department of Chahta Immi Language Program does a fantastic job of maintaining our traditional language through written documents and traditional songs. This program also offers Choctaw immersion classes for adults and students in our Choctaw Tribal Schools and culturally centered activities throughout the year.

What economic enterprises does your tribe own?

Mississippi Choctaws have pursued various economic development opportunities on our reservation for over 45 years. In 1969 we started a construction company to build houses on the reservation. In the 1970s and '80s, we opened four manufacturing companies that employ more than 2,000 residents in our community. In the 1990s, we expanded into gaming and tourism with the development of casinos, hotels, and golf courses. Our tourism efforts have created more than 3,500 jobs for our community. In the early 2000s we expanded into more high-tech business ventures that require higher skills, but also pay higher wages for our tribal members.

Today, the Mississippi Choctaws operate a diversified portfolio of businesses that provide direct employment for approximately 4,000 workers.

What annual events does your tribe sponsor?

Throughout the year the tribe holds many events for our tribal members. We have Community Field Days in each community. I host a reservation-wide Thanksgiving feast and one in the Henning, Tennessee, community. We also celebrate the holidays with a Christmas tree lighting ceremony. These are all events that are mainly for our tribal members.

We do host a few events open to the public. Our main event, of course, is the annual Choctaw Indian Fair, now in its 66th year. The fair is held every year the second Wednesday through Saturday in July. This is where our Choctaw people showcase the pride we have in our culture. A month after the Choctaw Indian Fair—Friday, August 14, this year, beginning at 10 a.m.—we commemorate and honor the day our Mother Mound was returned to us with the Nanih Waiya Day celebration. The day includes a morning wreath-laying ceremony at the Nanih Waiya Mound near the Kemper–Neshoba county border and All-Star stickball games in the evening. 

What other attractions are available for visitors on your land?

Visitors to our reservation are encouraged to learn about our Choctaw people by visiting the Chahta Immi Cultural Center (CICC) or taking a pre-scheduled tour of our reservation lands, including the Nanih Waiya Mound, Lake Pushmataha, and the Choctaw Veterans Memorial. A popular tourist destination is our Pearl River Resort, with the Silver Star and Golden Moon casino–hotels, Dancing Rabbit InnDancing Rabbit Golf ClubGeyser Falls Water Theme Park, and Bok Homa Casino.  

How does your tribe deal with the United States as a sovereign nation?

We have a very good relationship with leaders on the federal government level. I have met with the president on a couple of occasions. I have made frequent travels to the U.S. Capitol to discuss a range of issues with our congressional delegation. Members of the delegation, in turn, have visited the reservation several times in the past few years and have been very supportive of our efforts. It’s important that we, as leaders, build and nurture strong government-to-government relationships that are mutually beneficial.

Chief Anderson and President Obama 2011

President Barack Obama and Chief Anderson during the 2011 White House Tribal Nations Conference at the Interior Department in Washington, D.C. Gannett/Stephen J. Boitano photo. 
 

What message would you like to share with the youth of your tribe?

Hard work, dedication, determination, and faith are the keys to success. Failures and mistakes can and will happen. But take those experiences as life lessons and move forward. Never let negativity or adversity keep you from reaching for the stars. Remember, we are all travelers on this journey called life. Keep in mind where you’ve come from and keep looking ahead to see where you are going. Always have appreciation for those who have supported you and always give God the glory.

Is there anything else you would like to add?

I’m grateful for this opportunity to lead my people as tribal chief. I am able to use this position to put forth many ideas and plans that I believe have and will greatly benefit the tribe and improve the quality of life on the reservation. None of this would have been possible without the support and encouragement from my fellow tribal members. To them, I offer my sincerest appreciation, and I pledge to keep doing my very best to ensure a better future for our people. 

Thank you.

Thank you.


All photos courtesy of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians; used with permission. 

To read other interviews in this series, click on the banner below. Meet-native-america
From left to right: Representative Ponka-We Victors (Tohono O’odham/Southern Ponca) taking the oath of office in the Kansas House of Representatives; photo courtesy of Kansas Rep. Scott Schwab. Bird Runningwater (Cheyenne/Mescalero Apache) at the Sundance Film Festival; photo courtesy of WireImage. Sergeant Debra Mooney (Choctaw) at the powwow in Al Taqaddum Air Force Base, Iraq, 2004; photo courtesy of Sgt. Debra Mooney. Councilman Jonathan Perry (Wampanoag) in traditional clothing; photo courtesy of Jonathan Perry. Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee) at Blackhorse et al. v. Pro Football, Inc., press conference, U.S. Patent and Trade Office, February 7, 2013; photo courtesy of Mary Phillips. All photos used with permission. 

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