June 09, 2017

Thinking about the Indian Removal Act, at the National Archives Museum and National Museum of the American Indian


"Our cause is your own. It is the cause of liberty and justice."

Principal Chief John Ross (Cherokee, 1790–1866), appearing before the U.S. Senate in 1836 to argue on behalf of the Cherokee Council against ratification of the Treaty of New Echota, ceding Cherokee lands to the United States

Removal Act at the US National Archives
Visitors to the National Archives in Washington, D.C., viewing the Removal Act of 1830. Photo for the National Archives by Jessica Deibert

This spring, I visited the National Archives Museum in Washington, D.C., to see the Indian Removal Act, on display in the Archives' Landmark Document Case. Signed by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830, the Removal Act, gave the president the legal authority to remove Native people by force from their homelands east of the Mississippi to lands west of the Mississippi. It became for American Indians one of the most detrimental pieces of legislation in U.S. history. Under the Removal Act, the military forcibly relocated approximately 50,000 American Indians to Indian Territory, within the boundaries of the present-day state of Oklahoma.

At the National Museum of the American Indian, we address the importance of the Removal Act in two major exhibitions—Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations, which opened in September 2014 and will be on view through 2021, and Americans, opening October 26 of this year and on view through fall 2027.

"Many of these helpless people did not have blankets and many of them had been driven from home barefooted. . . . And I have known as many as twenty-two of them to die in one night of pneumonia due to ill treatment, cold, and exposure." 

Private John G. Burnett (1810–unknown), Captain Abraham McClellan’s Company, 2nd Regiment, 2nd Brigade, Mounted Volunteer Militia, account of the removal of the Cherokee, from a letter to his children written in 1890

Removal Act of 1830 p 1 Removal Act of 1830 p 2

The Indian Removal Act, May 28, 1830. General Records of the United States Government, National Archives. Photos courtesy of the National Archives


Many Americans, and many people beyond the United States, know the story of removal—or part of the story. In the late 1830s, more than 20,000 Cherokee men, women, and children were removed from their homelands. Approximately one-fourth of these people died along the Trail of Tears—bayoneted, frozen to death, starved, or pushed beyond exhaustion. Less well known, perhaps, is that hundreds of other tribes shed tears as well as they were forced to leave their homes to make room for non-Indian settlement and ownership of their land. Through American expansion, every tribe lost land its people originally called home.
 

"They were not allowed to take any of their household stuff, but were compelled to leave as they were, with only the clothes which they had on." 

—Wahnenauhi (Lucy Lowrey Hoyt Keys, Cherokee, 1831–1912), account of the Cherokee removal written in 1889, published by the Smithsonian Bureau of American Ethnology in Bulletin 196, Anthropological Papers, No. 77

The museum’s exhibitions look at the Removal Act from the broader perspective of events at the time it was enacted and during the nearly two centuries since. In the companion book to Nation to Nation, Robert N. Clinton, Foundation Professor of Law at the Sandra Day O’Connor School of Law at Arizona State University, describes the growing sense of national strength that allowed the federal government to move away from conducting negotiations with Indian nations as a sort of diplomacy—based on transnational law, mutual interests, and tribal sovereignty—and toward the direct pursuit of its one-sided goals:

The War of 1812 eliminated the possibility of Indian alliances with Britain, which had posed a threat to the stability and security of the United States. Thereafter . . . the bargaining power in treaty discussions shifted greatly to the United States, and policy was increasingly dictated by the federal government. . . . After a decade of treaty negotiations on the subject, the southeastern states provoked a controversy over the continued presence of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Muskogee (Creek), Choctaw, and Seminole nations on lands within state borders. Congress decided to chart the policy unilaterally by adopting the Removal Act of 1830.

Nation to Nation also explores the place of the Removal Act in U.S. legal history. The exhibition shows how advocates and Native and non-Native opponents of removal battled in Congress and the courts—all the way to the Supreme Court—at the same time tribal leaders were working to ensure the survival of their people.

Americans, which will explore Indians and the development of America's national consciousness through four iconic events—Thanksgiving, the life of Pocahontas, the Trail of Tears, and the Battle of Little Bighorn—widens the museum’s perspective on the Removal Act even more. In developing the themes of the new exhibition, lead curator Paul Chaat Smith (Comanche) and co-curator Cécile R. Ganteaume wrote:

Democracy at the Crossroads—the section of Americans about the Trail of Tears—explores the contemporary relevance of removal and why it is still embedded in 21st-century American life. We focus on crucial elements of the history that usually do not receive the attention they deserve: A vigorous national debate over removal consumed the United States before passage of the Indian Removal Act. With the eyes of the Western world upon them, members of Congress cloaked the Removal Act in humanitarian language. The actual removal of Native nations from the South across the Mississippi was a massive national project that required the full force of the federal bureaucracy to accomplish. Finally, it is due to efforts of young Cherokees in the early 20th century that the expression “trail of tears” has come to be known throughout the country, if not the world, to represent a gross miscarriage of justice.

In the central space that links the four iconic events in Americans, visitors will find themselves surrounded by photographs and commercial art. The idea is to show how images of Indians—and Native names and words from Native languages—are and have always been everywhere around us in the United States. Once we look, we can see them as national symbols on monuments, coins, and stamps; in the marketing of just about anything you can think of; in the Defense Department's naming conventions for weapons; and as part of pop culture. The reality of images and references to Indians everywhere is illustrated, for the time being, by the 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle on view in the museum’s atrium.

I confess that as I stood before the original Removal Act at the National Archives, it was hard for me to reconcile the events it set in motion with the motorcycle’s very American celebration of freedom. The curators of Americans hope, however, that the new exhibition will encourage visitors to be part of a new conversation among Natives and non-Natives about the place Indians continue to hold in our understanding of America. It’s an important conversation, and I’m committed to being part of it.

—Dennis W. Zotigh

Dennis W. Zotigh (Kiowa/San Juan Pueblo/Santee Dakota Indian) is a member of the Kiowa Gourd Clan and San Juan Pueblo Winter Clan and a descendant of Sitting Bear and No Retreat, both principal war chiefs of the Kiowas. Dennis works as a writer and cultural specialist at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

The Indian Removal Act of 1830 is on view at the National Archives Museum through June 14.

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May 26, 2017

The exhibition "Americans," opening in October, previews with a 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle

Motorcycle in atrium blog
A 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle, a loan from the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum in Birmingham, Alabama, is on view in the atrium of the museum. When Americans opens in the fall, the motorcycle will be moved to the exhibition gallery

The National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., recently installed an iconic 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle in its majestic Potomac Atrium. On loan from the Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum, this classic American motorcycle, with its Indian head fender ornament, will be featured in the museum’s exhibition Americans, opening in October. This exhibition explores Americans’ and American Indians’ deeply entangled history, made manifest by the imagery of American Indians all around us in our everyday lives.

Motorcycle fender ornament
The ornamental fender light representing an Indian wearing a Plains-style feather headdress became one of the icons of the brand. The Chief’s unmistakable large skirted fenders were designed in the 1940s.

Produced from 1922 until 1953, the Indian Chief was built as a large and powerful motorcycle by the Indian Motorcycle Company, once the largest motorcycle maker in the world. Founded in 1901—the first motorcycle manufacturer in the United States—Indian produced motorcycles for the U.S. military during World War I, survived the Great Depression with the help of two Du Pont brothers, and went on to build motorcycles for the Allies during World War II.

Indian tank
In 1928 the Hendee Manufacturing changed its name to the Indian Motocycle Manufacturing Company ("motocycle" without an R), now the Indian Motorcycle Company. "No more popular or wealth-producing name could have been chosen," the company's first advertising executive observed. The elegant script logo appears in chrome on the Chief's fuel tank.

Manufactured in a range of radiant colors, vintage Indian motorcycles are highly coveted by collectors enthralled by their early technical advancements and styling enhancements. To give an example, in season 2, episode 6 of the TV series Billions, hedge-fund manager Bobby “Axe” Axelrod takes a private moment to sit upon his newly acquired vintage Indian Four as a new monarch sits upon his rightful throne.

The Du Pont yellow Indian Chief Motorcycle now on view at the museum is one of four specially highlighted objects that will function as anchors in the Indians Everywhere section of the Americans exhibition. As the exhibition's introductory gallery, Indians Everywhere will confront visitors with the ubiquity of American Indian imagery in American popular culture. This bold, immersive display of more than 300 photographs and other images is designed to arrest our attention. But much more than that, it is intended to focus our thoughts on what, unknowingly, Americans have created and accepted as the white noise of our lives. No other country in the world is as fixated on one segment of its society as the United States is on American Indians. Why is this? Why are images of American Indians—some real, most imaginary—everywhere we look in American life, from boardroom to stadium, farm to inner city, fashion runway to tattoo parlor, Hollywood studio to military base, factory to highway?

Moving beyond now-commonplace discussions reflecting the politicization of visual culture in the United States, Americans delves deeply into the historic reasons behind this phenomenon. Whether taken-in sweepingly or considered in detail, Indians Everywhere reveals not only the time span of this imagery—its use began with Paul Revere and the revolutionary generation and has continued unabated to the present day—but also the myriad unexpected, sometimes paradoxical contexts in which it appears. American Indian imagery has been used by the federal government to distinguish the United States from other nations and to define the nation for its citizens, by U.S. armed forces to express military might, by American corporations to signify integrity, and by designers, such those who created the 1948 Indian Chief, to add luster and cachet to commercial products.

Motorcycle + admirers
An unexpected and fun thing to see at the museum, the Indian Chief also carries a message that will be explored further when Americans opens in October: Indians are everywhere in American national and pop culture, and have been for centuries. Why is that? 

Within Americans, Indians Everywhere—the backdrop of American life—provides a starting point for exploring four foundational events in U.S. history: Pocahontas, Thanksgiving, the Trail of Tears, and the Battle of Little Bighorn. The heart of Americans lies in thinking about how each of these events has affected and shaped America’s national consciousness and Americans' lives. In Americans these four events illuminate political realities when and after they occurred and, ultimately, our changing understanding of what it means to be an American.

The title of the exhibition is a play on words. In the Oxford English Dictionary, the first historical definition provided for “American” is: “An indigenous inhabitant of (any part of) the Americas; an American Indian.” This usage was common until the early 19th century. As visitors move through Americans, from the imagery of Indians Everywhere to the four events, the museum hopes to spark a greater awareness of the history American Indians and non-Indians share. We hope people will leave the museum newly attuned to the pervasive presence of American Indian imagery in everyday life. And when people begin see Indians everywhere, as they will—even on the front fender of a motorcycle widely believed to represent perfection in functionality and design—we hope they will see it for what it is: A phenomenon that exists in no other country of the world, one that ultimately speaks to the fact that the United States was carved out of the indigenous lands of American Indians, and that its history is inextricably and profoundly intertwined with American Indians.

—Cécile R. Ganteaume


Where do you see Indian imagery? Tell us, using #NDNsEverywhere. 

CRG-small-2017Cécile R. Ganteaume is an associate curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., and formerly at the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, in New York. A recipient of a Secretary of the Smithsonian’s Excellence in Research Award, she curates and writes on American Indian art, culture, and history. With lead curator Paul Chaat Smith, she is co-curator of Americans, scheduled to open on October 26, 2017. Her new book, Officially Indian: Symbols That Define the United States, will be published this fall to coincide with the opening of Americans.

Motorcycle photos by Matailong Du for the National Museum of the American Indian. Author photo by R.A. Whiteside.

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February 17, 2017

Native Fashion Now: Mixed Media Artist Barry Ace

Through September 4, 2017, the National Museum of the American Indian’s George Gustav Heye Center in New York celebrates indigenous designers from across the United States and Canada, from the 1950s to today. Native Fashion Now—a traveling exhibition organized by the Peabody Essex Museum and now making its final stop—explores the exciting and complex realms where fashion meets art, cultural identity, politics, and commerce. In a series of interviews, writer and cultural specialist Dennis Zotigh (Kiowa, Santee Dakota, and San Juan Pueblo tribes) speaks with artists and designers taking part in the exhibition, beginning with Barry Ace.

 

Parallel Tasking 1500
Barry Ace (M'Chigeeng First Nation), Parallel Tasking (front and back), 2000. Mixed media.

 

Congratulations on having your work chosen for Native Fashion Now, and thank you for doing this interview. Please introduce yourself.

Thank you. My name is Barry Ace, and I am a practicing visual artist drawing inspiration from multiple facets of my Anishinaabeg culture. My work can be found in numerous public and private collections in Canada and abroad. I am an enrolled member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Manitoulin Island, Ontario. 

BarryAcebyRosalieFavell
Barry Ace (M'Chigeeng First Nation). Photo by Rosalie Favell (Métis)

Can you give us your Native name and its English translation?

It’s Ace, pronounced Es. The Ojibwe word for clam is es. A small clam is esiins or esens, depending on the dialect.

Where did you grow up and where do you call home now?

I grew up on Manitoulin Island and in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. Home now is Ottawa, Ontario.

How old were you when you became interested in your art form?

Perhaps when I was seven or eight years old. I helped gather material and made Anishinaabe splint-ash baskets with my great-aunt Annie Owl-McGregor. 

Who are the individuals who inspired you?

My grandmother Mary McGregor-Ace and great-aunt Annie Owl-McGregor, both of whom were traditional Anishinaabe art-makers—beadwork, quillwork, basketry.

Have you competed and won any awards for your work?

My work won the K. M Hunter Visual Arts Award in 2015.

05_barry-ace_reaction Nigik Makizinan (Otter  Moccasins)2

Shoe2Detail
Barry Ace (M'Chigeeng First Nation), mixed media. From top to bottom: Reaction, 2005. Nigik Makizinan (Otter Moccasins), 2014. Efface, 2017.

What does the title Native Fashion Now mean to you?

To me, it means contemporary Native American fashion by contemporary Native American designers and artists.

Where do you envision the future of Native fashion to be headed on the world’s stage?

With so many talented Native American designers and artists on the scene now creating new works, I envision an exciting future on the international stage. The work designed and made by Native American designers and artists is exciting, innovative, and diverse. 

How do you describe the relationship between your work and traditional Native art forms?

Drawing inspiration from multiple facets of traditional Anishinaabeg culture, I create objects and imagery that utilize many traditional forms and motifs. I then disrupt the reading of these works with the introduction of other elements and technology, endeavouring to create a convergence of the historical and the contemporary. 

When you are asked by the media to explain your work, how do you answer?

I usually give an answer similar to the description of my work above. 

On average, how much time does it take you to complete one of your creations? 

Several weeks to several months. I work in my studio, five days a week, eight hours per day.

What is one of the biggest challenges you have faced in creating your art form?

Too many ideas and not enough time.

What do you do to get inspired to be creative?

Go to my studio, to powwows in the summer. Visit family, friends, and artist peers. 

Are there any unique signature styles that you are known for? 

My work uses electronic components—capacitors, resistors, light-emitting diodes—to replicate Great Lakes–style floral beadwork.

How do your earlier art forms differ from what you produce today?

Perhaps my work today has become more complex and diverse in design and materiality.

In your opinion, is it significant to have this exhibition open in New York during Fashion Week?

It is significant, because the exhibition showcases the diversity and creativity of our Native American fashion designer and artistic communities in both the United States and Canada.

“It is worn across the shoulder” -Detailx2
Barry Ace (M'Chigeeng First Nation), Aazhooningwa'igan “It is worn across the shoulder" (detail), 2015. Mixed media.

In the exhibition, are you presented as a Pathbreaker, Revisitor, Activator, or Provocateur? 

I am a Provocateur. I don’t consider myself a fashion designer, but instead a visual artist. I work in textile and draw from my Anishinaabeg material culture as a confluence between the historical and contemporary. My work is more often than not something that you wouldn’t necessarily wear, but I think that it pushes the boundaries through materiality and new aesthetics in contemporary Anishinaabe art.

Where can people go to learn more about you and your art?

My website, Barry Ace Arts. There is also a short video online produced by K. M. Hunter Foundation. 

Is there anything else you'd like to add?

I would like to thank the Peabody Essex Museum and curator Karen Kramer, for her vision, tenacity, and insight in bringing together this timely and innovative exhibition. I would also like to thank the amazing Native American designers and artists from the United States and Canada in the exhibition. It is truly and honor to exhibit alongside so many talented individuals.

 

Native Fashion Now is on view at the National Museum of the American Indian in New York through September 4, 2017. Barry Ace's work is represented in the exhibition by Reaction.

Native Fashion Now is organized by the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts. The Coby Foundation Ltd. provided generous support. The New York presentation of this exhibition and related programming is made possible through the generous support of Ameriprise Financial and the members of the New York Board of Directors of the National Museum of the American Indian. Additional funding provided by Macy’s.

Unless otherwise stated, photographs are ©2017 Barry Ace, all rights reserved.

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March 09, 2016

"Unbound" opening in New York March 12: Artists in the gallery will talk about their work

Saturday, March 12, five contemporary artists will be on hand at the National Museum of the American Indian's Heye Center in New York for the opening of Unbound: Narrative Art of the Plains

In celebration of Women's History Month, the museum presents Crossing Lines: Women and Ledger Art. Traditionally ledger art is most frequently associated with men, but many women are outstanding artists in the Plains narrative style. Meet three women who use the art form to tell their own unique stories. Starting around 11 a.m., Unbound artists Lauren Good Day Giago (Arikara/Hidatsa/Blackfeet/Plains Cree) and Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty (Assiniboine/Sioux) will be available in the exhibition gallery to talk about their work. In the Heye Center's Great Hall, up-and-coming ledger artist Wakeah Jhane (Comanche/Blackfeet/Kiowa) will demonstrate ledger drawing.


Emil Her Many Horses and Lauren Good Day GiagoCurator Emil Her Many Horses (Oglala Lakota) and artist Lauren Good Day Giago, preparing Lauren's piece Honoring Grandpa Blue Bird to go on exhibit in Unbound. Lauren created the painted dress to honor her grandfather's military service.


The women artists will be joined in the gallery by two fellow Unbound artists—Dallin Maybee (Northern Arapaho/Seneca) and Chris Pappan (Kaw/Osage/Cheyenne River Lakota).

Brief biographies  of Lauren Good Day Giago, Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty, Dallin Maybee, Chris Pappan, and the other contemporary artists whose works will be on view in Unbound are available in the exhibition's online media kit. To read more about Wakeah Jhane, visit her website.


Unbound: Plains Narrative Art will be on view at the National Museum of the American Indian in New York from March 12 to December 4, 2016.

Unbound  is curated by Emil Her Many Horses (Oglala Lakota), with historic works from the museum's collections by 14 artists. The 11 who are known by name are Long Soldier (Lakota/Nakota), Mountain Chief (Blackfeet), Bear’s Heart (Southern Cheyenne), Zo-tom (Kiowa), Black Chicken (Yanktonai), Canté-wani′ća/No Heart (Yanktonai), Chief Washakie (Shoshone), Spotted Tail (Crow), Old Buffalo (Lakota/Nakota), Rain in the Face (Lakota), and Ćehu′pa/Jaw (Hunkpapa Lakota).

Works commissioned by the museum for Unbound are by Dr. Ronald Burgess (Comanche), Sherman Chaddlesone (Kiowa), David Dragonfly (Pikuni), Lauren Good Day Giago (Arikara/Hidatsa/Blackfeet/Plains Cree), Darryl Growing Thunder (Assiniboine/Sioux), Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty (Assiniboine/Sioux),Terrance Guardipee (Blackfeet), Vanessa Jennings (Kiowa/Pima), Dallin Maybee (Arapaho), Chester Medicine Crow (Apsáalooke [Crow]), Chris Pappan (Kaw Nation/Osage/Cheyenne River Sioux), Joe Pulliam (Lakota), Martin E. Red Bear (Oglala Lakota), Norman Frank Sheridan (Southern Cheyenne/Arapaho), Dwayne Wilcox (Oglala/Lakota), Jim Yellowhawk (Cheyenne River Lakota).

Generous support for the project is provided by Ameriprise Financial. 

#UnboundNarratives

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March 03, 2016

"Unbound: Narrative Art of the Plains"—3 quick questions for curator Emil Her Many Horses

On Saturday, March 12, the exhibition Unbound: Narrative Art of the Plains opens at the National Museum of the American Indian's George Gustav Heye Center in New York. Unbound reflects the dynamic tradition of narrative art among Native nations from the Great Plains. Plains narrative art took shape through various media, such as painted deerskin war shirts and buffalo robes. As trade broadened during the 19th century, artists created elaborate battle scenes on large canvas tipi liners and used muslin cloth, as well as hides, to record winter counts, some documenting more than 100 years of history. When the U.S. government established forts and reservations on the Plains and ledger books became available to tribal members, Plains artists filled their pages with narrative drawings. Native artists began reviving “ledger art” in the 1970s, creating vibrant and widely collected drawings and paintings. Unbound includes historic drawings and paintings, as well as more than 50 works by contemporary Native artists commissioned by the museum. 

Next Thursday, March 10, at 6 in the evening, Emil Her Many Horses (Oglala Lakota) will give a curator's talk on Unbound at the Heye Center. Attendees will also have a chance to preview the exhibition. We asked Emil to take a few minutes in the run-up to the opening to give us a brief interview. 

What gave you the idea to do this exhibition?

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Page captioned "Catching a Shark July 1875," from a drawing book, ca. 1875. Bear’s Heart (Southern Cheyenne, 1851–82). Ft. Marion, St. Augustine, Florida. Paper, graphite, colored pencil, ink. 20/6231

Emil Her Many Horses: Two things, really. One is that the museum has such a great collection of Plains narrative art. These are drawings or paintings that document war deeds and horse raids, and also personal experiences, like courtship, or subject matter that is both historic and personal, like the books of drawings made in the late 1870s by the southern Plains men held in the military jail at Ft. Marion. In addition, the Smithsonian has remarkable photographs and other materials that shed light on the historical narrative art in our collection.

Dallin Maybee Indian Prosecutor
Indian Prosecutor, 2012. Dallin Maybee (Northern Arapaho/Seneca, b. 1974). Antique ledger paper, graphite, colored pencil, ink. 26/8964

My second reason is that, as an artist who takes part in many art shows, I see what Plains artists are doing with narrative art now. Plains narrative art has always reflected personal, as well as tribal, experiences, and that is still true of these contemporary pieces. Dallin Maybee, for example, illustrated his experience as a prosecutor at Gila River. He has also created what he calls an indigenized version of Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are, because he loved the book as a child and loved reading it to his own children. Lauren Good Day Giago has taken what was traditionally a men’s art form and used it to show traditional activities, but traditional activities of women and families. I knew Dwayne Wilcox would do something humorous, and one of his drawings for the exhibition shows powwow dancers busy on their cell phones.

Lauren Good Day Giago Making of Relatives

Dwayne Wilcox 4G
Above: 4G Better than One-G, 2012. Dwayne Wilcox (Oglala Lakota, b. 1954). Antique ledger paper, graphite, colored pencil, ink. 26/8952 
 
Left: Making of Relatives, 2012. Lauren Good Day Giago (Arikara/Hidatsa/Blackfeet/Plains Cree, b. 1987). Antique ledger paper, colored pencil, graphite, ink, felt-tipped marker. 26/9023

 


Is there something you learned or something that surprised you in curating the exhibition?

I was surprised, and I think other members of the exhibition team were surprised, by how truly strong the museum’s collection of Plains narrative art is, and especially by how strong the collection of contemporary narrative art is. With the support of donors, we've been collecting 20th- and 21st-century art for a while now, and it shows.


Is there an idea in particular you hope visitors will take away from the exhibition? 

I hate to reduce it to one idea, but I guess I want people to see how the historic tradition of narrative art inspires artists today. For example, we have the Long Soldier Winter Count—with entries drawn by several artist-historians from 1798 to 1902—on view with Red Bear’s Winter Count—Martin E. Red Bear’s record of a significant event in his life for each year from 1980 to 2004. Long Soldier Winter Count

Red Bear's Winter Count


Above:
Long Soldier Winter Count, ca. 1902. North Dakota. Muslin, paint. 11/6720 

Right: Red Bear's Winter Count, 2004. Martin E. Red Bear (Oglala/Sicangu Lakota, b. 1947). Canvas, acrylic paint. 26/8020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sherman Chaddleson Black Leggings Society dance
Painting of a Ton-Kon-Gah, or Kiowa Black Leggings Society, dance, 2013. Sherman Chaddlesone (Kiowa, 1947–2013). Paper, graphite, watercolor, ink. 26/9402

I also hope visitors will find specific works that are meaningful to them. As the exhibition’s curator, I feel strongly about every piece in Unbound, but I have to admit, what comes to my mind when I think about this question is Sherman Chaddlesone’s last painting. Sherman’s great-grandmother kept a ledger calendar for 78 years, which he credited with inspiring his interest in narrative art. Unbound includes a few of his paintings of Kiowa tribal history and cultural traditions. One shows members of the Kiowa Black Leggings Society dancing around a tipi. The striped tipi design is used specifically by the society, and the dancers wear red capes like the capes captured by Kiowa warriors in battle with the Mexican Army. Today the Black Leggings Society is made up of U.S. military veterans, and as a Vietnam veteran Sherman included himself among the dancers. He died before he finished the painting or signed it, but I visited him while he was working on it, and he pointed himself out among the dancers with great pride. 

In commissioning new work for Unbound, I asked all of the contemporary artists to think about what best represents them. I think that’s something people will definitely be able to take away from the exhibition.


Thank you for taking the time to do this interview before the opening.

Thank you. I hope you can come to the talk Thursday evening. 

 

Unbound  is curated by Emil Her Many Horses (Oglala Lakota), with historic works from the museum's collections by 14 artists. The 11 who are known by name are Long Soldier (Lakota/Nakota), Mountain Chief (Blackfeet), Bear’s Heart (Southern Cheyenne), Zo-tom (Kiowa), Black Chicken (Yanktonai), Canté-wani′ća/No Heart (Yanktonai), Chief Washakie (Shoshone), Spotted Tail (Crow), Old Buffalo (Lakota/Nakota), Rain in the Face (Lakota), and Ćehu′pa/Jaw (Hunkpapa Lakota).

Works commissioned by the museum for Unbound are by Dr. Ronald Burgess (Comanche), Sherman Chaddlesone (Kiowa), David Dragonfly (Pikuni), Lauren Good Day Giago (Arikara/Hidatsa/Blackfeet/Plains Cree), Darryl Growing Thunder (Assiniboine/Sioux), Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty (Assiniboine/Sioux),Terrance Guardipee (Blackfeet), Vanessa Jennings (Kiowa/Pima), Dallin Maybee (Arapaho), Chester Medicine Crow (Apsáalooke [Crow]), Chris Pappan (Kaw Nation/Osage/Cheyenne River Sioux), Joe Pulliam (Lakota), Martin E. Red Bear (Oglala Lakota), Norman Frank Sheridan (Southern Cheyenne/Arapaho), Dwayne Wilcox (Oglala/Lakota), Jim Yellowhawk (Cheyenne River Lakota).

Generous support for the project is provided by Ameriprise Financial. 

#UnboundNarratives

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