Meet Native America: Gari Pikyavit Lafferty, Chairwoman of the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah

In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native people today. —Dennis Zotigh 

Please introduce yourself with your name and title. 

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Paiute Tribal Chairwoman Gari Pikyavit Lafferty.

Gari Pikyavit Lafferty, chairwoman of the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah

Where is your tribe located? 

Our tribe is made up of five bands of Paiutes. From the north to south in Utah, we are the Koosharem Band, in Richfield, Utah; Kanosh Band, in Kanosh; Cedar Band and Indian Peaks Band, in the Cedar City area; and Shivwits Band, in St. George. 

Where were the five bands originally from? 

We have always been in central and southern Utah area. 

What is a significant point in history from your people that you would like to share? 

On Febuary 27, 1953, the federal government outlined a strategy for termination. Our tribe was terminated in 1954. Federal assistance ended for our people. It's written that almost immediately after termination began, it became clear it was a mistake. Struggling for survival, the Southern Paiutes in Utah worked their way through an alien legal and bureaucratic maze to finally win restoration on April 3, 1980. During termination the Paiutes lost well over 15,000 acres of land. 

What responsibilities do you have as a tribal leader? 

Responsibilities comes in all forms, from attending monthly meetings, attending state affairs, federal issues that may have some kind of effect on your tribe. It's vital as well that your Native community see you as often as possible. 

I am on the road a lot, out and about for our tribe. It's very critical for me to be active in my Native community. I like being with the people, and I never forget they are the ones who put me here as chairwoman. I should add, though, that my family time is important to me more then ever. 

How did your life experience prepare you to lead your tribe?

It's interesting how someone comes to tribal leadership or tribal politics. As for myself, it's something that was instilled in me at a young age. I am proud to say that with my dad and grandfathers and many family members, leadership runs deep in my family. My sister Marguerite Pikyavit Teller was the first woman elected chair of the Paiute Tribe. It was only a matter of time for me.

I am a mother of five amazing children—Heston Smith, Mckinley Smith, Sable Lafferty, Charles M. P. Lafferty, and Aries Jackson. I'm married to one great man, Charles Lafferty, who supports me. At times he doesn't understand why I have chosen to put myself in this position. It's not for everyone. You have to be cut from a different kind of cloth. If you're a weeping willow, it's not for you. But if you can withstand the storm that comes with politics, then this is the job for you.

My dad told me at a very young age, "Gari, you will be sitting at the head of the tribe one day." I have always been active in community affairs as well—school, church, band, tribal. 

Who inspired you as a mentor? 

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Chief Mckay Pikyavit.

My father is my greatest mentor of all. I am very proud to say that my father was the last chief of our people—Chief Mckay Richard Pikyavit. My dad was so amazing there just isn't enough paper or time to say all I would like to say about him. My father was very much a family man, he took his responsibilities as a father very seriously. My father was a farmhand at a young age, then worked for our county road department. We had a large family, so when my brothers and sisters got older my mother worked as well.

My father was very active in tribal affairs. Community, church, school—my dad said you have to be out doing all you can in your community to make a difference. My father was one that spearheaded the work for our tribal restatement under the federal government. I remember being a young child and seeing my dad traveling the state of Utah to meet with others working towards the goal of our restoration as a federally recognized tribe. After long years of hard work, it came to pass on April 3, 1980, signed into law by President Carter. The dream of action came to pass.

I saw the long hours, days, months, years it took for this to happen. So I think that if I can do a fourth of what my dad achieved for the Paiute people, I will leave feeling I was a very accomplished leader for our people. Well, I have to say that I am very proud I am the daughter of Mckay Richard Pikyavit, the last chief of the Paiute people.

How is your tribal government set up?

Our government is set up with a tribal chairman and five council members representing the five bands. Six elected office-holders in all sit on our Tribal Council.

Is there a functional, traditional entity of leadership in addition to your modern government system? 

No, there is no traditional entity of leadership.

How often are elected leaders chosen? 

Elections are held every four years for a term of four years. First, each band area elects its band chairman or chairwoman. Members of the band eighteen years and older are eligible to vote. Once that is done, then all five newly elected band chairs' names go into the election for tribal chair. This election is open to all tribal members living anywhere in the United States.

Each band chair reports monthly to the Tribal Council on that band's affairs. One interesting note: This is the first time our Tribal Council members are all women. 

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Tribal Council of the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah, 2014. From left to right: Toni Pikyavit, chairwoman of the Koosharem Band; Lara Tom, chairwoman of the Cedar Band; Jeanine Borchardt, chairwoman of the Indian Peaks Band; Gari Pikyavit Lafferty, tribal chairwoman; Hope Silvas, vice-chairwoman of the Shivwits Band; Corrina Bow, chairwoman of the Kanosh Band. 

How often does the Tribal Council meet? 

Tribal Council meets twice a month, more often if necessary. Each band has a representative for health, education, and housing. Together they make up all boards for the tribe. Each band regularly holds a meeting as well, monthly or more often. Some bands have more going on than others in their areas.

Additionally, a General Council Meeting consisting of all enrolled tribal members over the age of 18 is held each year on the first Saturday in November. 

Approximately how many members are in the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah? 

We have around 900-plus members. 

What are the criteria to become a member?

For enrollment in our tribe is you have to have at least one fourth Paiute blood from your mother or father. 

Is your language still spoken on your homelands? If so, what percentage of your people would you estimate are fluent speakers?

Sadly, like for many other tribes, our language is spoken by our elders. And not too many of them have many othes to talk to. 

What economic enterprises does your tribe own?

All of our bands have their own economic enterprises. There are lots of tribal members who have their own enterprise for making money from sewing, bead work, painting.

What annual events does your tribe sponsor? 

Annual events vary from each band area. But as far as the tribe, we have our Restoration Gathering, an annual meeting where we hold our powwow, pageant, softball tournament, hand games, feast, parade. This all takes place the second weekend of June. This is celebration of our restoration as a federally recognized tribe, along with the annual meeting that's held in April. 

What attractions are available for visitors on your land? 

A great attraction would be to come and visit us during our Restoration Gathering. Also, we live in the most beautiful place in the world, with many national and state parks around us. 

How does your tribe deal with the United States as a sovereign nation? 

Our concern as a soveriegn nation is just to be a good neighbor and offer support if and where it's needed. 

What message would you like to share with the youth of your tribe?

To our youth, I'd like to say that life is short. Enjoy it. Take every opportunity you can to make the very best of it for you and your families. We all make mistakes, but don't let them define who you are, or who you want to become. Use your mistakes as building blocks to your future. Listen to your elders. They may not all have a high school or college diploma, but what they do have is life experiences. And you need both to have success in your life.

You see only one person in me, but I stand on many shoulders of family members, as well as tribal people who have come before me. I will always be grateful for those who have worked very hard to get our tribe to where it is today. We are small compared to other tribes, but we have many great people who are thriving and working very hard for our people today and for those to come.

Is there anything else you would like to add? 

I would like to end with saying, we are living our grandparents' dreams, what they hoped would come to pass for our Paiute people. Let's not disappoint them. Just as they were to us, we are to our grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Let's make sure we are writing their history well. 

Thank you.


All photos are courtesy of the Paiute Tribe of Utah and are used with permission.

To read other interviews in this series, click on the banner below. Meet-native-america
From left to right: Representative Ponka-We Victors (Tohono O’odham/Southern Ponca) taking the oath of office in the Kansas House of Representatives; photo courtesy of Kansas Rep. Scott Schwab. Bird Runningwater (Cheyenne/Mescalero Apache) at the Sundance Film Festival; photo courtesy of WireImage. Sergeant Debra Mooney (Choctaw) at the powwow in Al Taqaddum Air Force Base, Iraq, 2004; photo courtesy of Sgt. Debra Mooney. Councilman Jonathan Perry (Wampanoag) in traditional clothing; photo courtesy of Jonathan Perry. Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee) at Blackhorse et al. v. Pro Football, Inc., press conference, U.S. Patent and Trade Office, February 7, 2013; photo courtesy of Mary Phillips. All photos used with permission.         

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September 11, 2014

Haudenosaunee–U.S. Treaty of 1794 Comes to the Museum


Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations
, opening September 21, offers people a rare opportunity to see documents that have shaped our history and still define our mutual obligations. The treaty between the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and the United States is one of the earliest negotiated between Native Americans and the U.S. government under the Constitution. 

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Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan of the Onondaga Nation of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Oren Lyons, PhD; Tadodaho of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chief Sidney Hill; Suzan Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee), guest curator of Nation to NationKevin Gover (Pawnee), director of the National Museum of the American Indian; and Jim Gardner, executive for Legislative Archives, Presidential Programs, and Museum Programs at the National Archives, unveil the Treaty of Canandaigua of 1794, on loan to the museum.


In 1794 representatives of the Six Nations of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and an American delegation led by President Washington's ambassador, Timothy Pickering, met on treaty grounds near Canandaigua, New York, to negotiate an accord. The two parties wished to confirm the peace between them and to secure their respective interests. Working together, the Six Nations—Seneca, Cayuga, Onondaga, Oneida, Mohawk, and Tuscarora—sought to recover lands in New York State they had lost to the United States following the Revolutionary War. The United States wanted Native lands in Ohio and assurances that the Haudenosaunee would not ally themselves with the Ohio tribes against the U.S. Army. 

More than 1,600 Haudenosaunee people gathered for the treaty council. Cornplanter (Ki-On-Twog-Ki), a Seneca war chief, and Red Jacket (Sagoyewatha), a distinguished Seneca and speaker for his fellow chiefs, took the lead, although others joined the talks as well. In the end, after 23 days of negotiations, the United States ceded back more than a million acres of Haudenosaunee lands and agreed to an annual payment of goods. The Haudenosaunee ceded all claims to Pennsylvania and the Ohio Valley. 

This week, the National Archives lent the Treaty with the Six Nations to the National Museum of the American Indian for the opening of the exhibition Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations. Haudenosaunee Faithkeeper Chief Oren Lyons and the Tadodaho of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, Chief Sidney Hill, came to Washington to welcome the treaty to the museum. 

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AP953247871443_7 AP364887375351_6Top left: Gail Joice, collections manager at the museum, and Terry Boone, exhibits conservator for the National Archives, prepare to move the treaty to the exhibition gallery. Top right: Chief Lyons and Director Gover study the treaty after installation. Center: Chief Hill and Chief Lyons scan the names of the leaders who signed the treaty for the Six Nations. Bottom: The signature and seal of Ki-On-Twog-Ky, also known as Cornplanter, and the signatures of President George Washington and Secretary of State Edmund Randolph; Washington often had a secretary add his signature to documents, but the president signed this treaty in his own hand.

Nation to Nation represents one of the rare times the treaty has been exhibited. James Zeender, senior registrar in the Exhibits Division of the National Archives, describes the document's journey to this point:

After its signing on November 11, 1794, the treaty was brought back to the seat of government in New York City. President Washington obtained the Senate's advice and consent and ratified the treaty on behalf of the United States Government.  Washington's ratification is visible as two smaller pieces of parchment attached to the treaty at the top and bottom of the original, signed on lower piece by Washington and Secretary of State Edmund Randolph. In the years to come, the treaty was kept with other treaties at the State Department until they were moved to the new National Archives Building on the Mall in the mid-1930s. At the beginning of this century, the treaty and other highly valuable records were relocated temporarily during a major renovation of the building downtown and returned a few years later.

Historic documents are fragile and sensitive to light, so original treaties can be displayed for only a short time. The treaty kept by the Haudenosaunee is held in the collection of the Ontario County Historical Society in Canadaigua, where it is shown once a year on Treaty Day, November 11. The treaty on loan from the National Archives will be on view at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., from September 21, 2014—the opening of Nation to Nation and the tenth anniversary of the museum on the National Mall—through February 2015. 


The transcript of the Treaty with the Six Nations originally appears in Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties, compiled and edited by Charles J. Kappler, 1904. 
Digitized transcript made available by the Oklahoma State University. 

The photos above were taken September 8, 2014, at the National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C., by Kevin Wolf/AP Images for the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian. 

 

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September 03, 2014

Archaeology Fest—Get Hands-On with Native History at the Montauk Indian Museum

Archaeology Fest Poster


It’s not often one has the opportunity to spend a Saturday learning how to blow a dart or throw a spear, but the third annual Montauk Archaeology Fest, a free event hosted by the Montauk Indian Museum on Oct. 4, 2014, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., promises to offer this and more.

“Kids and adults love the hands-on activities,” said Lawrence Cooke, Montauk Indian Museum president and founder. “We have people travel from all over the country to participate in the events.”

Experts will be on site sharing expertise in many different areas, including:

  • Flint-knapping (stone tool manufacture) 
  • Fire-starting 
  • Tanning 
  • Earth-fired pottery making 
  • Wampum making 
  • Roasting/baking of Native foods

And much more!

“Every person finds their own interests, but many really like to try throwing the atlatls,” Mr. Cooke said.

The mission of the Montauk Indian Museum is to educate and enlighten the public regarding the long Native American history of the Montauk area. The museum is located at:

Montauk Highway & Second House Road 
Montauk, New York 11954

Directions: Take the Montauk Highway toward Montauk. Just before you enter town, the museum is on the left, slightly past the corner of Second House Road and Montauk Highway.

For more information, call (631) 903-9603 or visit http://montaukindianmuseum.org. A video of past Archaeology Fest activities can be viewed here.

—Joshua Stevens

Joshua Stevens is Public Affairs specialist at the National Museum of the American Indian in New York. 

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What an excellent event this should be!
Would love to be able to come but I live in Seattle :(

September 02, 2014

Protecting a Way of Life: Royce Manuel Leads a Workshop and Demonstration on Traditional Bows and Arrows

By Keevin Lewis 

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On Thursday, June 12, 2014, at the Talking Stick Visitor Center in Scottsdale, Arizona, around 60 interested people attended a bow and arrow showcase and reception highlighting a commmunity art project conceived and led by Royce Manuel (Ak-Mierl Aw-Thum). In the snapshot above, you can see community artists Chris Hughes (holding a quiver) and Jacob Butler (in the baseball cap) talking about the bows and arrows they made from trees found in their home regions. And then, of course, there were bow and arrow demonstrations for guests at the reception and, that Saturday, for interested families at a nearby park. The results were wonderful to see, as some arrows easily cleared 30 yards! 

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Leading up to these events, Royce held a four-week bow and arrow workshop that focused on how to make a self bow and arrows that are good enough for hunting. The workshop targeted fathers and sons, uncles and nephews, and each participant had the opportunity to harvest wood for his own bow and gather plants for his arrows. Obsidian was provided for making arrowheads.

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The National Museum of the American Indian supported Royce’s project—his research into bows and arrows and other objects in the museum’s collections outside Washington, D.C., the workshop, and the reception—through the Artist Leadership Program.

You can see Royce talking about his experience at the museum and his plans for the community art workshop in a short video on the museum’s YouTube channel. For more information on other artists’ projects supported by the Artist Leadership Program, scroll through our section of the museum’s blog or visit our photo album on Facebook. Information about the program, including its goals and detailed instructions on how to apply, is available on the museum’s website

Keevin Lewis (Navajo) is coordinator of the Artist Leadership Program at the National Museum of the America Indian.  

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August 31, 2014

This Day in the Maya Calendar: September 2014

Cholq'ij, the Maya sacred ceremonial calendar of 260 days—a cycle of 20 Day deities and 13 numbers—is the basis of the Maya spirituality that survives to this time, practiced daily among millions of Maya people, in thousands of communities. The interpretation of the days can vary from one Maya people to another. The interpretations given here are based on sustained conversations and participation over three decades with Maya Q'eqchi calendar priest Roderico Teni and daykeeping families in the area of Cobán, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala, by Jose Barreiro (Taíno), head of NMAI’s Office of Latin America, and his wife, Katsi Cook (Mohawk). Glyphs representing the Day lords appear throughout Maya Country; these were painted by Esteban Pop Caal (Q'eqchi Maya) of Cobán.

For more background to this series, please see Jose's introduction, "Living in the Practice." For further insight into the role of the Day lords in everyday life, please see the Maya Journal. For the complete year so far, please see the Maya calendar archive.

Illustrations: Esteban Pop Caal (Q'eqchi Maya), calendar glyphs. Cobán, Alta Verapaz, Guatemala; 2003. Paint on wood. Purchased from the artist. 26/2685. Photos by Ernest Amoroso, NMAI 

5 Tijax  |  Saturday, September 20, 2014

262685_TijaxCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 5 Tijax. Tijax is Fish, also Obsidian; 5 is one hand. Tijax is a day of doctors, good to pray for surgeons and all medical practitioners; a day of sacrifice and liberation from suffering; a day of sharp, cutting objects, of knives and scalpels and scissors. Tijax is a safeguard for domestic animals against predators, a good day to pray for all animals that are sacrificed, both in ceremony and in everyday life. Tijax is a good day to use metal (a machete, scissors) to "open the sky"—to solicit rain, solicit life, split black clouds. Gossip, calumny, and sorcery, on money and sexual matters, can be overcome on this day; on a high-number day, disputes can turn public and become debilitating. Tijax is a good day for seasoned masters to fortify daykeeping trainees against ridicule by envious countrymen or evangelicos. It is not a good day to plant. —Jose Barreiro 

4 Noj  |  Friday, September 19, 2014

262685_NojCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 4 Noj. Noj is Woodpecker; 4 is a balance. Noj is a woman's highest intelligence. Maya knowledge and wisdom live in this day—good science to support positive deeds, good projects, good business, a good home. On Noj good ideas are available through the intelligence connected to the movement of the earth. Boys born on this day have important female qualities and can be attentive to the knowledge of nature, which rules all. Girls born on this day can be clear leaders. This is a good day to hear advice and make decisions, a good day to feed the mind, recognize curiosity, and strengthen memory. Noj is one of the four Yearbearers. —J. B. 

3 Ajmac  |  Thursday, September 18, 2014

262685_AjmacCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 3 Ajmac. Ajmac is Bee, also Vulture; 3 is a rotor. On Ajmac ancestor spirits can detect and smooth the thread of time in our lives. Prudence, intelligence, ancient wisdom are in this day. This is a day to plead forgiveness for serious faults and to be judged. It is a day that demands moral rectitude, respect, and sincere analysis. On this day our faults (stains) must be faced and paid for; humble request for pity is encouraged. Ajmac is a propitious day for the women of a household to make peace with one another after conflict, to apologize for sharp words; it is a good day to pray for smooth relationships and the renewal of agreements among women. Hard luck can face those born on Ajmac. —J. B. 

2 Tz'ikin  |  Wednesday, September 17, 2014

262685_Tz'ikinCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 2 Tz'ikin. Tz'ikin is Bird, best represented by the Hummingbird, also the Quetzal and Eagle; 2 is duality. Tz'ikin carries messages between the Heart of Earth and Heart of Sky. Cold, heat, light, air, cloud are its elements. Love, intuition, precognition are strong in those born on this day. Tz'ikin is a good day for humans to follow birds to the corn—to find good material luck. This is a good day to ask for revelation and intelligence, for vision, and for abundance; a good day to ask for collaboration in projects or for personal freedom. On this day, women have the privilege to ask for their husbands and sons to triple the family money. —J. B.  

1 I'x  |  Tuesday, September 16, 2014 

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Corresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 1 I'x. I'x is Jaguar; 1 is the beginning. I'x is woman's energy day. This is a day to connect with your own land and to pray for its original owners; to pray for and appreciate your house; to pray for the finances to buy and sustain land; to ask for fertility in humans and animals; to request vigor and strength for reproductive organs, particularly female. I'x is a good day to pray to the mountains in favor of the land. It is a good day for a woman to request strength in her husband's commitment to matrimonial stability. People born on I'x have a close relationship to el Mundo and receive good access to precious metals. I'x is a good day for solitude and meditation. —J. B.  

13 Aj  |  Monday, September 15, 2014 

262685_AjCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 13 Aj. Aj is Cane Reed; 13 is the highest imbalance. Aj begins the women's cycle, sentiments of family and home, the spinal cord. Aj is life and receives life. This is a day of resurgence and renewal, as in the reed and the corn; a day for the triumph of good over evil, life over death; a day of happiness, renewal of food, money, the heart of life. People born on this day renew their communities; they are sickly as children and sturdy as adults; they are especially lucky; they are good awakeners of their families and communities; they make good midwives. Aj is a good day to ask for clarity of destiny, a good day to pray for the protection of your life and of the newborn, a good day to pray for twins, a good day to pray for humanity. —J. B. 

12 Eh  |  Sunday, September 14, 2014

262685_Eh

Corresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 12 Eh. Eh is Bobcat, also the Path and the Tooth; 12 is the highest balance. Eh can orient individuals, groups, or communities to their destiny. Eh is the day to ask for protection from dangers and obstructions during travels—specifically, that on your road the attention of thieves or highway police or border inspectors will be deviated from your trajectory. Solitude is in Eh, light rain, kindness, alignment. People born on this day can be good counselors, spiritual guides with the gift of prayer to Ajaw (Creator) on the destiny of things. Also, good dentists are born on this day. Eh is one of the four pillars of the 20 days, a Yearbearer—a strong, especially sacred day. A prayer started in Batz can be carried by Eh through the full cycle of 20 days. —J. B. 

11 Batz  |  Saturday, September 13, 2014

262685_BatzCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 11 Batz. Batz is Monkey; 11 is high turbulence. Monkey braid, monkey fingers, monkey tail, Batz is the grasp of the monkey's hand so tight and braided the fist will not let go, even in death. Batz is a good day for beginnings, and for some Maya daykeepers, Batz begins the 20-day calendar. Batz is unity, a good day to tie things together, a good day for a marriage or to start a construction, a good day for initiation into the ways. Batz is the thread of time that rolls out from under the earth, weaving life until cut, weaving time into history. People born on Batz are calm and self-confident; they make good spiritual guides and leaders, and goodhearted architects. —J. B.

10 Tzi  |  Friday, September 12, 2014

6a01156f5f4ba1970b019b04c65ab2970d-200wiCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 10 Tzi. Tzi is the Canine, the guardian; 10 is a high balance. Dog, Wolf, Coyote, Tzi can be snarly, terrifying the unprepared with his bark and his bite. Tzi people are zealous to guard the sacredness of ceremony, to identify and punish "intruders," those not disciplined to participate. Benevolent to friends and fierce to enemies, Tzi is steady to reward or punish. Tzi will punish those who disrespect the Days and the spirit of the family. This is a good day to ask for mystic insight for leaders so that they can seek and discover hidden things, so that they can be just. Tzi has strong sexual energy, hard to restrain. When this energy is defined, people born on Tzi make loyal friends, husbands, and wives. —J. B. 

9 Toj  |  Thursday,  September 11, 2014

262685_TojCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 9 Toj. Toj is the mystic Fish—the tear of jade and drops of rain, water falling; 9 is a triple rotor. Toj is a day of making even, a good day to pay spiritual and financial debts and to collect what you are owed. This is a day of evenness for a family, a good day for parents to pay the family's debt to el Mundo, good for the oldest son to appreciate the father and the father to appreciate the mountain. Illness can be deviated from the family by making a ceremonial offering on this day. —J. B. 

8 Anil  |  Wednesday, September 10, 2014

262685_AnilCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 8 Anil. Anil is the fertility in the seed, Anil is Rabbit; 8 is a double balance. Anil is red, white, yellow, black—the four colors of corn, the seed of life that is the unity of the world. Anil is renewal after death, regeneration of the earth. Anil people are four-directions people and can be good travelers. This is a day of coming back, a day to generate and appreciate abundance, a day of declaring love to create a new relationship, a day to announce the wish to do business, a day of finding lost things, a day to ask for help in overcoming shyness. —J. B. 

7 Kiej  |  Tuesday, September 9, 2014 

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Corresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 7 Kiej. Kiej is the Deer; 7 is a pivotal number. Kiej is the four directions, four hoofs striking the earth at once, the quaternity of the cosmos linked to prayer, highest aviso to el Mundo—the living world. Kiej is the staff of authority, keen energy of a chief to detect danger, perception of the leader buck, his horns. Kiej is a good day to pray for mental and physical agility, a day of agile travelers and good communicators. It is a day also to ask for clarity before gossip and ill intentions. A major gift of nature, Kiej holds indefatigable energy. He is one of the four main carriers of time. —J. B. 

6 Kame  |  Monday, September 8, 2014 

262685_KameCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 6 Kame. Kame is the Owl and the recognition of death; 6 is a middle, even number. A day that recalls the night, tranquility, and silence, Kame is a good day to ask for the ancient and recent ancestors who have gone on, to thank them, and to remember them with purpose. This is an appropriate day to extend reconciliation, to feel and give forgiveness, to develop patience, to invoke against mortal illnesses, to access superior knowledge. Without fear, it is a good day to approach the spiritual dimension, "the enchantment." —J. B. 

5 Kan  |  Sunday, September 7, 2014 

262685_KanCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 5 Kan. Kan is the Snake; 5 is one hand. Kan is the ancient origin—Gucumatz, the Plumed Serpent. This is a day of strict and impartial justice, a day of definition and maturity, and a good day to offer respect and to thank the corn. On Kan, matters of justice, judges, and courts can be cleared up. This is a good day to pray that truth and justice are manifest in the Heart of Sky, Heart of Earth; a good day to put aside jealousies and request equilibrium in life and in the family. It is a day to ask for physical strength and patience, to contemplate our spiritual evolution, and to rekindle the internal fire. —J. B. 

4 Kat  |  Saturday, September 6, 2014

262685_KatCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 4 Kat. Kat is Spider, also Web and Fire; 4 is a balance. On Kat the unity of the people is paramount, and knowledge is deepened. Kat is the network of the sacred heart, the family hearth. Today is a good day to pray for your family fireplace, the spirit of the fire that belongs in the home, the one that calls other spirits to ceremony and speaks for them. Kat is the net that hauls in the fish and the net that holds the ears of corn, a day that can bring the fruition of things and the untangling of complications. This is a good day to help free prisoners from captivity, to request vigor and power for the weak. —J. B. 

3 Aqbal  |  Friday, September 5, 2014

262685_AqbalCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 3 Aqbal. Aqbal is the Dawn, also Bat; 3 is a rotor. Aqbal is clarity, the separation of darkness and light as the Sun disperses the fog and obscurity of night. This is a good day to ask for a peaceful and happy daybreak, a day to find hidden and lost things, a day to wash away tears of sadness. On Aqbal, the sacred fire is recognized and appreciated. Aqbal is a good day to clean the ashes (renew the heart) of a fireplace and to present a new baby to el Mundo. A potential bride or groom can be revealed on this day. Harvesting of corn can begin on this day. People born on Aqbal relate in the present and are a special link between past and future. They are early risers, good workers, tranquil and kind, strong before an enemy, good researchers and finders of hidden things, often called "the candle of the home." —J. B. 

2 Iq  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

262685_IqCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 2 Iq. Iq is Wind, also Moon; 2 is duality. Wind is powerful, violent, driven of itself, identity. A day of strong emotion, Iq is also a healing day. Good wind is nutritional for human minds; it is the mystic breath and vital inspiration of nature. On Iq, a breeze or wind that splits against your face is a blessing and a cleansing to purge your head and body of illness. Respiratory ills are prayed over on this day. This is a good day to appreciate all of Creation. The Day lord Iq is one of the four Yearbearers, or mams, a creator who helped finish the world and put breath (essence) in human beings. People born on Iq are inclined toward spiritual ways and can impulsively tap into cosmic sources. —J. B. 

1 Imox  |  Wednesday,  September 3, 2014

262685_ImoxCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 1 Imox. Imox is Lizard; 1 is the beginning. Imox is the very force of gravity and a good day to pray for creativity and for rain. Imox can open el Mundo to receive cosmic messages. Known as a "crazy" day, Imox requires much concentration and control. A day of high male intelligence, also impatience and agitation, Imox can be difficult. Grounded on its left side, left arm, this day is easily unbalanced and in need of clasping by left and right hands. Imox can be good if held in the balance of the Heart of Sky and Heart of Earth; unattended, Imox can manifest imbalance, mental nervousness, and even death. People born on Imox are open and sincere, but indecisive—in need of ceremony to set the positive to override the negative. —J. B. 

13 Ajpu  |  Tuesday, September 2, 2014

262685_AjpuCorresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 13 Ajpu. Ajpu is Caracol, Spiral Shell; 13 is the highest turbulence. Ajpu is the Sun, captain of time, a day of personal strength and for good to triumph over evil. Ajpu, who cares for boys and guides men, begins the men's cycle. This is a day to connect with the ancestors, who can reward and punish. Death is reachable and amenable; spirits can ask permission to enter el Mundo, the living world. Day of the warrior and blowgun hunter (cerbatanero), Ajpu is the strong blow of the dart that hits its target, a good day to pray for stealth or for a break in enemy lines. Ajpu is also a good day to start building on a house, a good day to make prayers for women and for success in lactation. —J. B.  

12 Kawoq  |  Monday,  September 1, 2014 

262685_Kawoq

Corresponding with this day in the Gregorian calendar is 12 Kawoq. Kawoq is Turtle, also Sky Serpent; 12 is the highest balance. Kawoq is a high woman day—a day of duality in all of nature and a guardian of contentment. It is the day of woman and man, lightning and thunder, fecundity and imagination; a day of midwives; a day of prayer for unity within the home, strength within the family, renewed strength for convalescents, and the smoothing of all irritation. This is a good day to turn bad medicine back on itself. Kawoq attends to young women in pregnancy, labor, and delivery, and to full realization for all women; it is a day of their sash. Kawoq is also a good day to commemorate the Staff of Authority, a good day for the men of a family and community to pray for the coffers (good fortune) of the women and for the protection of the home. Good midwives, writers, and architects are born on this day. —J. B. 

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August 29, 2014

Meet Native America: Jonathan Poahway, Comanche Business Committeeman #1

In the interview series Meet Native America, the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian invites tribal leaders, cultural figures, and other interesting and accomplished Native individuals to introduce themselves and say a little about their lives and work. Together, their responses illustrate the diversity of the indigenous communities of the Western Hemisphere, as well as their shared concerns, and offer insights beyond what’s in the news to the ideas and experiences of Native people today. —Dennis Zotigh 


Jonathan Poahway e
Comanche Business Committeeman Jonathan Poahway speaking at the 2014 Johnson–O'Malley Senior Banquet.  Cache High School, Cache, Oklahoma.

Please introduce yourself with your name and title.

Jonathan Poahway, Comanche Business Committeeman #1.

What is your name in your language, and what does it mean?

Tsaa tuhoi—it means Good Hunter.

Where is your tribe located?

The Comanche Nation Complex is in Lawton, in southwest Oklahoma.

Where were the Comanche originally from?

Wyoming—we were originally a band of the Shoshone, or they were a band of us, perhaps. 

What is a significant point in history from your people that you would like to share?

No United States war with any tribal nation lasted more than ten years, except the war against the Comanche. That lasted for forty years. Also the Comanche were the “roadblock” against Spanish expansion and conquest on this continent! 

What responsibilities do you have as a member of the Business Committee?

To secure a financially stable future for all tribal members, as well as for future generations. 

How did your life experience prepare you to lead?

I was raised as the youngest child of 15. The majority of us were raised by a single parent after our father died. Our mother was a fluent speaker of Comanche, with English as her second language, and she worked very hard to provide for us all. She worked two and sometimes three jobs. It instilled in us children a fine work ethic. Her parents spoke only Comanche and taught her to take care of others before yourself, and that is also ingrained in us. So it is in my heart to take care of all our nation, especially the children and our children's grandchildren.

Who inspired you as a mentor?

I would have to say one of my older brothers, who was on the council once as well. He taught me that honesty is the best policy, also that doing right will positively affect more people than doing wrong would.

Are you a descendant of a historical leader?

No.

Approximately how many members are in your nation?

Approximately 16,000. 

What are the criteria to become a member of the Comanche Nation?

To be enrolled, you must be one-eighth Comanche Indian blood quantum and a descendant of an original Comanche Nation land allottee. 

Is your language still spoken on your homelands? If so, what percentage of your people would you estimate are fluent speakers? 

Only by the elderly. Fluency is probably as low as 3 percent. There is a language committee working to change that.

How is your tribal government set up?

We have a chairman who is in charge of day-to day-operations, a Business Committee whose members are policymakers and decide on investments under a certain amount, and the General Council—the people,  all members of the Comanche Nation who are eighteen years old or older—who vote on investments over the amount.

How often are leaders chosen?

The chairman has a two-year term, and seats on the Business Committee are for a three-year term.

How often does the government meet?

The Business Committee meets once a month, and the General Council meets once a year.

Johnny and niece
Jonathan Poahway and his daughter, Melissa Marie Koehler, Miss Comanche Nation College, at the Comanche Nation College Pow Wow. Lawton, Oklahoma; May, 2014.

How does your nation deal with the United States as a sovereign nation?

We are supposed to be treated with the respect given to foreign nations. Sometimes we are not, and have to fight for and remind the United States government of our sovereignty. 

What attractions are available for visitors on your tribal lands?

We have casinos, the Comanche Nation Tourism Center, a water park, and the Comanche National Museum and Cultural Center.

What annual events does your nation sponsor?

We have the Comanche Nation Fair, which is coming up September 26 through 28, and a Comanche Nation Homecoming Pow Wow to honor our veterans.

What message would you like to share with Native youth?  

Education will take you a long ways and open many doors. Respect—for others—will keep those doors open!

Is there anything else you would like to add?

It is our responsibility as stewards of the land to pass down to many generations the knowledge and ability to take care of our mother, Earth!

Thank you. 


All photographs courtesy of Committeeman Poahway, used with permission.

To read other interviews in this series, click on the banner below. Meet-native-america
From left to right: Representative Ponka-We Victors (Tohono O’odham/Southern Ponca) taking the oath of office in the Kansas House of Representatives; photo courtesy of Kansas Rep. Scott Schwab. Bird Runningwater (Cheyenne/Mescalero Apache) at the Sundance Film Festival; photo courtesy of WireImage. Sergeant Debra Mooney (Choctaw) at the powwow in Al Taqaddum Air Force Base, Iraq, 2004; photo courtesy of Sgt. Debra Mooney. Councilman Jonathan Perry (Wampanoag) in traditional clothing; photo courtesy of Jonathan Perry. Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee) at Blackhorse et al. v. Pro Football, Inc., press conference, U.S. Patent and Trade Office, February 7, 2013; photo courtesy of Mary Phillips. All photos used with permission.         

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Johnny Poahway represents a change in tribal governmental politics, he is a young and educated and a Comanche leader who advocates for language preservation, leadership, and fiscal responsibility for the Comanche people.

culture is the wealth of a nation. I appreciate your cultural diversity and how that culture was still maintained. Pictures photos in this article show a truly unique high culture. This is my hometown in Indonesia—Trawas.

 
 
 
 

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